Appalachian Trail Massachusetts: Section 1

Over the weekend we did get back up to the trail in Massachusetts, but opted for the shorter section to the VT border from North Adams instead of south from there over the Greylock range. We did it as an out-and-back and did not venture further into Vermont as the Green mountain club requested people not hike the muddy trail until after Memorial day. Doing this section turned out to be a wise decision on many fronts. But most of all, the all-day heavy rain combined with cold temperatures predicted for Saturday did come, just minutes after we got off trail in the morning. We lucked out with nice weather Friday so the climb up the Pine Cobble wasn’t too sketchy and the view from the top was grand.  This was the longest and highest uphill we’ve done together, gaining about 1800’ from North Adams to the Vermont and Long Trail border.  We felt it the rest of the weekend in our legs.

We had a bit of excitement on the hike! One of the hikers at the campground called in for a midnight rescue as he was having abdominal pains, and so we met some EMT’s and firefighters who had to hike the 1.8 miles uphill to the campsite in the middle of the night and direct them to the bear box to get the hiker’s food. I was treated to a view of the bright starry night as I was out there chatting with them…  and many Barred owl calls… Also my fellow weekend ridgerunner from CT AMC came up to the campsite at 7am to meet us for coffee before his daughter’s lacrosse tournament in nearby Williamstown that day, so that was cool.  And I got 2 nasty black fly bites. Those little bastards got me at the end of the day when I was tired and filling up water and rolled up my sleeves where I had no bug juice on…. Duh!  They still itch and hurt so much I’m putting on cortisone regularly. I was warned about May in Massachusetts!

We saw only about 3 other hikers on the trip, including two girls staying at our campsite. It’s a really pretty walk along Sherman brook for the first few miles up out of North Adams. On a really hot day that would be paradise. I trekked it the extra mile south from Rt 2 on the way out Saturday morning to Pattison road. This way we could start there next time and not have to park in town and have a steamy concrete road walk before the long climb up the Greylock range.  After we got off the trail we spent the rest of the weekend exploring North Adams and Williamstown. We will come back to do the last 13 miles of the A.T. in Massachusetts in a month or two. It will still be there. Besides, then we get to enjoy the Bascom lodge….

I start ridgerunning in Connecticut this weekend over Memorial day, and then Fielden Stream and I are doing another New Jersey section in about 3 weeks with our Pennsylvania friends.

Trail miles: 5.1

Total miles hiked: About 11 (out and back, side trails)

  • Linus
Fielden Stream at the VT border

Fielden Stream at the VT border

The Massachusetts side

The Massachusetts side

Pine Cobble bad weather trail

Pine Cobble bad weather trail

View from Pine Cobble

View from Pine Cobble

CT AMC Ridge runners

CT AMC Ridge runners

Walking back into North Adams

Walking back into North Adams

Sunset over Bald mtn

Sunset over Bald mtn

The great view from the bad weather trail

The great view from the bad weather trail

Cairns on Pine Cobble

Cairns on Pine Cobble

Pine Cobble trail jct

Pine Cobble trail jct

My chipmunk friend and I had a nice chat

My chipmunk friend and I had a nice chat

Linus at the Long Trail

Linus at the Long Trail

First VT sign

First VT sign

Advertisements

Appalachian Trail Massachusetts: Section 3

Fielden Stream climbing up the gulf on North mtn

Fielden Stream climbing up the gulf on North mtn

Last weekend Fielden Stream and I finally got out for our first overnight backpacking trip of the year. What a long winter that was – the wait was tough. The few winter day hikes did not stoke my need for time in the woods enough, and I got quite out of shape. Well, we both did.

We picked up where we left off in Massachusetts, and did the section over North mountain from Dalton to Cheshire. We had already done 1 mile of it, and had to stop ½ mile short of the end due to parking areas. So overall it was about 8 miles. We stopped at the Shamrock Village Inn on the way to the trailhead so I could get a stamp in my A.T. passport. The lady who ran it, Laura, was very nice and let us also use the bathroom. She had cute dogs there that we enjoyed meeting. They get a lot of hikers there. I’ll get another stamp at St Mary’s church In Cheshire as we head out of town in 2 weeks.

Fielden Stream making a campfire

Fielden Stream making a campfire

We had a beautiful day on Saturday – perfect conditions to hike. Mid-60s during the day was mild enough to make the first climb of the year more manageable. It was about 1000’ up to the campsite but mercifully gradual. The woods were full of Trout Lilly and Trillium and there was a pleasant breeze as we reached elevation and walked along the ridge. Because the trees were just starting to leaf out there were nice westerly views of Savage Mtn and the range that extends north to Greylock. My new poles worked great on their maiden voyage. Though I did manage to lose one basket before I even used them so Fielden bought me a replacement set when getting her new trail runners – more on that later.

Sunset from Crystal Mtn Campsite

Sunset from Crystal Mtn Campsite

Of course when we reached the campsite trail it was UP .2 but it was a nice campsite, with a clean privy, a nice fire ring and a bear box. I had watered up before the campsite so didn’t need to do the hike downhill to the stream there. Fielden loved my Klymit X pillow so I let her use it and went back to my special clothing bag with the soft pillow side which works great for me. I tried using my neo air pump sack to inflate my sleeping pad but it wasn’t really working. Maybe I’m doing it wrong or maybe it was a great idea that needs more work.

Vesitbule cooking in the rain

Vesitbule cooking in the rain

After we were setup, we made a nice fire and chatted with some section hikers who arrived a bit later after a much longer day.  They retired to their tents early and we made dinner and enjoyed the fire before doing the same. We were treated to a nice sunset to the west and calls from a barred owl and another owl which I didn’t recognize. The day was complete.  We knew rain would come soon but were ok with it. This is part of the experience. And it wasn’t too cold.

The rain came later than expected – around 7 am. We were so happy to be out there we embraced the suck and did our first packing of our packs in our tent and my first cooking of the water for coffee at my vestibule.  We got packed up while remaining mostly dry and hit the trail by 815. I filled up at the first stream, to be safe.

Linus at Gore Pond

Linus at Gore Pond

Turns out there were about 5 more rushing streams between here and the Cheshire cobbles, not to mention the lovely Gore pond. Though with all its beaver activity I tend to avoid those sources. The extra weight was good training. The rain stopped for a while until we got to the Cobbles 3 miles north. We negotiated several blowdowns which I know the Mass crews will be up here in 2 weeks to address.

Beaver dams at Gore Pond

Beaver dams at Gore Pond

A slight mist of rain started as we reached the cobbles, a beautiful series of rock ledges on the northern end of the mountain, with commanding views west and south over Cheshire and Greylock and its sister mountains on the other side of the valley. The peaks were shrouded in mist, but it made the views all the more dramatic. We had a snack as we were getting hangry and then took a few photos and video for our Massachusetts video, which will be complete soon as we reach the end of the state. 19 miles to go!

Cheshire and Greylock from Cheshire Cobble

Cheshire and Greylock from Cheshire Cobble

It was a quick descent to Cheshire but with way more switchbacks than it appeared on the profile. So it was pleasant and easy. The cobbles hung over us for a bit of the descent and it really reminded me of Minnewaska State park and Sam’s point there. Once in Cheshire we got grand views of Greylock towering in the distance.  We were two and a half hours early for our shuttle. Our trail legs were alteady improving. We called her but could not reach her so we asked a friend who’s from the town where to eat and she recommended a spot half a mile down the rail trail. What’s another half mile on a flat surface?

Linus on Cheshire Cobble

Linus on Cheshire Cobble

The rain was starting again as was our hunger so we made for the restaurant and left a message for the shuttle to pick us up there at the original time. I completely demolished my plate and felt like a thru hiker! A beer or two made the meal complete (Fielden was driving!) and we got back to our car in a few minutes. We made plans for the shuttle for the next hike over the white whale, Greylock, and her sister mountains in a few weeks.

Greylock from Cheshire

Greylock from Cheshire

Fielden’s new trail runners were a tad too small so she got her first blisters in years. She will exchange them or return them and go back to her old shoes. I think she just needs to go up half a size and that should solve the issue.

I did not want to leave. I almost sulked as we drove home and I pretend-threatened-joked to Fielden Stream that I wanted her to turn around and go back with me and keep hiking after a nice stay in a hotel! Real life issues were suddenly coming back to me in force as they always do on the drive home and as I waited so long for this hike, I wasn’t letting go of it easily.

A great first adventure for the season. Luckily there’s much more ahead, and the next hike will push us to the highest peak and elevation gain we’ve done together, as well as the limits of our stamina. Can’t wait! It’s the best kind of hurt.

Hiker Hunger

Hiker Hunger is real

Miles day 1: 3.2

Miles Day 2: 4.6

Owls: 2

Cobwebs broken on trail: 6

-Linus

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pre-Season Newly Acquired Gear Testing- Part 1

Lightheart Gear solo quarter vented

Lightheart Gear solo quarter vented

As we get ready for the 2018 backpacking and my ridge-running season, I took advantage of the beautiful spring conditions on Easter Sunday to test some new gear I purchased over the winter. Of course it was snowing the next day and we ended up with half a foot of snow on the ground. April Fools a day late. (Easter was also April Fools day). As of this writing there were two more snowstorms followed by warm spring days since! Good old New England.

Lightheart Gear solo half vented

Lightheart Gear solo half vented

The first item is my new (used) Lightheart Gear solo tent. I bought it from a hiker on Whiteblaze.net. I am always researching gear, and especially great lightweight solo options for my ridge-running and volunteer weekends. Last year I bought a new REI Quarter-dome 1 for a great price on sale, and which at 39 ounces is a super-light option.  And I love the tent. They have since tweaked the design again. I guess my one issue with it was that the weird pole design always left me a little confused at set up time. And when you’re tired after a long day and setting up camp, you don’t wanna be fidgeting with the poles too long. Especially if its in the rain or the dark, or both. I did get used to it but there were still some times when I was doing it in a situation like those and did it backwards the first time. Plus its rather embarrassing when you’re fussing so much with your own tent when surrounded by other campers! The unusual design of that tent pole setup allows for a wider interior in the tent so it’s worth it but I just wanted something a little more of a no-brainer. And more room if I could get it.

Lightheart Gear solo fully vented

Lightheart Gear solo fully vented

On my many nights on the trail I see just about every tent design and model out there, and often ask the hikers about their tents. I then go about reading or watching reviews online and asking questions on hiking groups and forums as well. The Lightheart Gear solo is one of many ultralight options from cottage manufacturers on the market. They also make a slightly longer one for taller hikers called the solong.  I explored other options from Zpacks, Mountain Laurel Designs and more. When I saw the listing on whiteblaze I quickly did more research and found it to be not only a full 12 ounces lighter than my REI tent, but also more spacious and easier to setup. And it was at a great price so I jumped on it.

REI Passage Aluminum trekking poles

REI Passage Aluminum trekking poles

It uses trekking poles rather than included poles to pitch, but you can buy those if you don’t hike with trekking poles. This helps cut down on the weight. It’s also all one piece so you can set it up from the inside without the interior tent getting wet. While I know many 2- piece tents have a feature where you can first rig just the ground sheet and rainfly to avoid soaking your interior tent in the rain, I have to confess I’ve never tried that and it didn’t seem completely full-proof. I got this tent for about 45% off and it was in great shape. It has tons of room and is high enough to sit up in, as well as the ability to be quarter/half/three-quarter or fully vented. The manufacturer advised against spraying it with permethrin spray as did many on the online forums as this chemical doesn’t adhere to sil-nylon and voids the warranty. So I did not spray this tent like I do my others. Seam sealing is recommended for this tent, but the previous owner had the manufacturer do it at purchase. It costs a little extra ($35) but is worth it having a pro do it right the first time. The only negative feedback I’ve heard on this tent is that at 133″ long and 65″ wide, finding a camp spot can be tougher, as well as setting it up on a platform as it is also not fully free-standing. These things I will test in the field.

Stake-off (L to R): Zpacks, Vargo and MSR mini groundhog

Stake-off (L to R): Zpacks, Vargo and MSR mini groundhog

Regarding the trekking poles: As you know from my last hike, the handle broke off one of my poles on that hike so I had bought a new pair at REI the next day. So it was time to test them, and this tent together for the first time. Well I didn’t test them by hiking but I did expand them and compare all the features to other brand models at the store to make my decision. I know these REI poles last a long time and that the cork was the weak spot and so I replaced them with poles with hard plastic/rubber handles- the Passage model.  They are not super light but that’s the reason I bought them as well as price. I found the super light super expensive poles to not support my weight as well.

The only ding with the tent purchase was that the stakes I got from the seller were a bit heavy, and when the tent requires ten stakes to fully pitch it, you want lighter ones. I didn’t expect him to send me his best, lightest stakes at this price. He didn’t even charge me shipping. He just wanted to pass it on to another hiker who would enjoy it and make some of his investment back.

This Dove came to check out my tent

This Dove came to check out my tent

So I ordered a set of four more super light titanium stakes from Zpacks, with their microfleece beanie (which I will review later) to make my set of ten. I find these hook-shaped stakes more effective than my MSR groundhogs for guylines. Or at least, they are my preference. I still use the mini groundhogs for staking out the 4 corners of the tent. The other hook stakes I had previously purchased from Amazon — they are Vargo. They are close enough in size and this setup overall should take the stake weight down a bunch. In the process of deciding how many more stakes I needed,  I also spent a while in the garage gear closet to take inventory and make sure all my other tents have the right number of stakes in their bags.  I don’t want to loan one out and we realize later I had taken the stakes from it!

The Lightheart Gear Solo packed up

The Lightheart Gear Solo packed up

I love the Lightheart tent and everyone who saw it set up on Easter and then got to hold it in their hands and feel how light it was packed up were as impressed as I was. Fielden Stream laid down in it for a minute and tested it too. I enjoyed reading “Balancing On Blue” from thru-hiker Fozzie while lying in it and trying out another new purchase. That’s in part 2: Kylmit Massdrop Pillow and JetBoil JetGauge. A dove even came to visit me in my yard and checked out my new tent!  I will keep the QD-1 for a while and if the LHG solo pleases me as much on the trail as it did in my yard, I will return the karma and sell the QD-1 to another hiker. I have one other solo tent which I like because you can pitch the fly like an awning. So even though its less roomy on the inside and a little heavier, Its very convenient if you need to cook when its raining. So I will keep that one for now.

Lightheart Gear Solo Tent Specs

weight: 27oz (before seam sealing)

floor space: 30 sq ft.

head room: 43 in

width: 65in at center

length: 133 in

single/double wall: double

doors: 1

Full specs and more info from the website

— Linus

 

Ridgerunner Weekend #6

Well it turns out they needed me for one more weekend and I was more than happy to go, with the great October weather. Well, I’m ALWAYS happy to go. The weather was in the 60s-70s all weekend, even if a little overcast. Lows were predicted in the mid-50s which is balmy for October, and I was thrilled to have my friend Brian along for the overnight to share hiking and camping stories until hiker midnight. The scouts were out in force, and we also had our annual CT AMC chapter Appalachian Trail day and picnic, so I got to spend a few hours with all of my favorite trail people, and make some new friends. Miles were low but morale and hiker numbers were high so I spent a lot of time interacting with hikers, scout troops and our great volunteers out doing their work parties on waterbars, invasive removal, and general cleanup. The foliage was really turning, so while I had to be a little more careful on the leaf-covered trail, the scenery was gorgeous.

I hope to get out one more time in November for an overnight with friends if the weather holds up.  The plan is the Mohawk trail. I just have to remember to fill out their backcountry camping permits!

Photos below.

Miles day 1: 6.6

Miles day 2: 5.1

  • Linus
    Frog hunting flies on Schaghticoke mtn

    Frog hunting flies on Schaghticoke mtn

    Autumn Sassafrass

    Autumn Sassafrass

    Linus and Brian on Scaghticoke Mtn

    Linus and Brian on Scaghticoke Mtn

    New blowdown art

    New blowdown art

    A fine cup of morning Joe

    A fine cup of morning Joe

    Home for the night

    Home for the night

    Selfie with the new hiker sculpture in Kent, CT

    Selfie with the new hiker sculpture in Kent, CT

    Ned Anderson Bridge, Ten Mile and Housatonic Rivers confluence

    Ned Anderson Bridge, Ten Mile and Housatonic Rivers confluence

    Nice new waterbar

    Nice new waterbar

    Wingdale, NY from Ten Mile Hill

    Wingdale, NY from Ten Mile Hill

    Ned Anderson Bridge and the Housatonic River

    Ned Anderson Bridge and the Housatonic River

    Foliage on display

    Foliage on display

Appalachian Trail: MA Section 4

Heading Nobo again

Heading Nobo again

Today we finished the rest of section 4 and started the first mile of section 3 in Massachusetts. This was mostly for logistical reasons in both cases. Distances to and from overnight campsites or long term parking lots usually dictate where we start and end. Sometimes those are a little different than where the sections actually begin and end. We did the last few sections southbound for logistical reasons but finally are heading north again.

We did this one as a day hike so we could have a luxury day in nearby Lenox for Fielden’s birthday Saturday. We enjoyed visiting the local outfitter so she could try on some new packs, and they were great and also referred us to their friends’ tapas place in town for dinner. Which was also amazing. A great town.

Heading up Warner Hill

Heading up Warner Hill

I tried to get us a nice B&B for the night but as it was a holiday weekend, in the Berkshires, during prime leaf season (normally), all we could manage was a motor lodge. It was nice and clean though and it just allowed us more money to spend on dinner.

It was unseasonably warm and in hindsight we could have tented and done an overnight. Though it was pouring when we woke up and we had a really great day previous so we were not complaining!

Marilyn ‘the cookie lady’ shuttled us again from the lot just west of Dalton up to where we left off on Blotz road, just north of October Mountain State Forest.

Near whiteout on Warner Hill

Near whiteout on Warner Hill

The rain continued for about the first hour and a half of our hike, and sadly the view of Greylock from Warner Hill was fogged out. But it did keep things cooler and when we reached the powerline halfway through our hike, we had a good view of Pittsfield to the west as the skies cleared. We met lots of day hikers, and one hiker in Dalton as we neared the end who had only 10 miles to go until he finished his entire Appalachian Trail hike through many years of sectioning. We seem to have met a lot of those this season.

Pittsfield to the west

Pittsfield to the west

We passed Tom Levardi the trail angel’s house as we entered town from the woods but didn’t stop to see if he was home as menacing storm clouds loomed ahead. We had also planned to stop at Sweet Pea’s for ice cream but they were closed.

All in all it was a great, mostly easy section and good for us because it had been a few weeks since we hiked last and we could knock out more miles with the easier terrain.

Fielden Stream on Day Mtn

Fielden Stream on Day Mtn

Unless it’s unseasonably warm in mid-November, we won’t be back up here until spring 2018. We have 26 miles left of Massachusetts, and in order to complete it, really a 30 mile trek as the first road crossing in Vermont is 3.5 miles in. We will likely do Dalton to Cheshire as a short overnight warmup in the spring and then come back to tackle Greylock and walk into Vermont sometime during the summer when the days are long.

This weekend is out CT AMC chapter’s Appalachian Trail day and BBQ, so I will be doing that and bringing a friend along for her first hike on the trail.

Trail angel Tom Levardi's house

Trail angel Tom Levardi’s house

This hike I did last year is led by our trails chair and follows the old route from Macedonia Brook State Park to Caleb’s Peak where the current trail goes through. Then my friend Brian and I are planning to do an overnight on the Mohawk Trail (also the old A.T.) and I’ll knock out another 8 or so miles of that trail so I can finish it too soon.

The leaves are just starting to really change in the Berkshires as weather has been odd, but I’m hoping it will be more dramatic this weekend in Connecticut now that it’s cooling off and raining a lot again.

Miles: 7.9

— Linus

Ridgerunner Weekend #5 – Salisbury to Sages Ravine

No rain, no pain, no maine!

No rain, no pain, no maine!

This was my final weekend as a summer ridgerunner for the 2017 season, and it was full of excitement!  I knew there was rain in the forecast but wow did it rain. I hit the trail Sunday morning around 10am in Salisbury, headed for Sages Ravine just over the Massachusetts border; about 7 miles and change. It was raining when I drove up and raining when I started and raining when I got to Lion’s Head an hour later. It was raining hard. I know this is part of the job and I’ve been lucky considering this is the first day I was out in weather this bad the whole season. Lion’s head was completely socked in so there was no view. I pushed on to Riga shelter to take a snack break and get out of the rain for a bit and dry out my raincoat which was no match for this kind of rain and wet through partially in less than 1.5 hrs.  I called my friend Brian from the shelter to see if he could meet up to hike later while I had some trail mix and let the coat dry out. There was a tiny bit of a view at Riga but not much. Not the amazing normal view anyway.

the "trail" up Lion's Head

the “trail” up Lion’s Head

I set out about 30 minutes later when the rain diminished a bit. Often times the forecast says rain but the estimate is over what actually occurs. Not the case today. A few minutes after I hit the trail again the downpours continued. Luckily no one left me any trash at the shelter or in its bear box I had to carry out.

The trail was literally a river. There was no way, nor is it recommended, to walk around as there is laurel right up to the edge and doing so can damage them and the wildflowers along the edges. It was colder in the morning but by this point was in the low 60s so walking through them was just kinda like walking along the beach in boat shoes. Trail runners are great in this scenario though because the water flows right out and it was actually kind of refreshing. My only concern was swamp foot from hiking for hours with wet feet. I wasn’t hiking long enough for it to get that bad, thankfully.

Socked in Lion's Head "view"

Socked in Lion’s Head “view”

I made another stop at Brassie Brook shelter to take a bathroom break and spoke to a section hiker taking shelter under its roof. I had already seen about 14 backpackers braving the weather. After all, this weather is not all that uncommon for regular backpackers.  I was moving as fast as I could to get to camp and out of the rain. I was lucky enough to have been permitted use of the caretakers tent so I was looking forward to being able to set up and unpack without the rain bearing down on me. I would be luckier than most on this day.

The rainy "view" at Riga

The rainy “view” at Riga

I made the judgement call to take the Undermountain and Paradise Lane trails from Riga junction rather than go over the many steep and exposed rock faces on Bear mountain, particularly the north side. This added a mile but was far safer.  I need to get a new otter box because my phone was not responsive to my squishy wet fingers and the humidity also made it act up again like in Harpers Ferry in July.  Somewhere in the process of my mad 8 mile dash in the rain, I managed to jam my big toe so the bone feels bruised if not fractured (hopefully not). It hurts but is functional so hopefully it’s just bruising. All that rushing meant I made good time though and was at camp by 230.

A tent inside a tent

A tent inside a tent

When I arrived at the campsite, two hikers were in the caretakers tent drying out gear. This is not allowed, please don’t do this, the tent is for staff only. However given the horrible conditions, and the friendly nature of the two men, I allowed them time to pack up their wet things in the shelter of the tent and we chatted a while. I gave them some advice on the upcoming section as they wanted to push much farther, having zeroed most of the day waiting out the rain. As there are some precarious bits ahead, especially when wet, I let them know about the campsites before those areas should they need to pull back and wait out the rain again. And of course, the rain began again shortly after they left around 330. When it finally ended it was around 630-7. I enjoyed listening to it on the roof of the tent as I always do. I enjoyed it even more this time as I was finally out of the rain.

Exterior of caretaker's tent

Exterior of caretaker’s tent

Despite seeing a decent amount of backpackers on the trail, no one else came in to spend the night at the campsite. I was surprised as it’s a very popular one and there was a group there just the night before in addition to the two men I met. I think given the rain they all opted for a campsite with a shelter and a roof.

I had dinner and setup my small tent inside the large canvas tent, so I had effective bug protection. This was the final weekend for that tent so my coordinator informed me the bug net and cot were already packed and they’d be packing the tent the next day after I left.  So I was grateful to have access to it, even in its most minimal state. It did what I needed most, kept me dry!  I changed out of my wet clothes and hung everything to dry out the best they could.

Dawn at Sages Ravine

Dawn at Sages Ravine

I had managed to get a little reception on my phone by going up the hill so I did a round around the campsite and checked the privies, bear boxes and other tent sites and coordinated with Brian to meet him the next morning at the intersection of the A.T and the Northwest road. He and his friend were planning to hit the state high point on nearby Mt Frissell, so we planned to hike over Bear together and then they could do the Frissell trail next as it was right across the road from the Northwest road and Bear Mountain road where they’d come out.

Some screech owls and other critters lulled me off to sleep… sorta. I also read the register book to help!

Monday, Labor day, was a gorgeous one. And the challenging scramble up the north side of Bear was a lot more fun with friends. It was also mostly dry at that point being so exposed to the sun and so vertical. I made quick friends with Jodi, and we met the other ridgerunner I knew was also out for his final weekend as we neared the summit. We spent some time on the summit tower with some day hikers and then headed down the south side of Bear, with its great southern and western views. I pointed out Frissell to them and some of the other mountains on their next hike.

Linus and Jodi climbing the steep north side of Bear Mtn

Linus and Jodi climbing the steep north side of Bear Mtn

When we got to the trail junction for Bear Mountain road, we made plans to see each other at our CT chapter’s A.T. day in October,. exchanged photos and headed our separate ways. I made quick time to Lion’s head and remarked to myself how quickly all those rivers on the trail were already dried up.  I passed large numbers of day hikers and quite a few more backpackers. Everyone was out in force enjoying the gorgeous day. Funny, I had said “beautiful day isn’t it!” to all the hikers as a joke the day previous, and today it was in earnest. Lots of hikers had their dogs out with them, and one family at Lion’s head were visiting with their son for the first time since they had gotten engaged there. The warm, dry weather also allowed me to dry out my shoes, socks and clothes which I had to put on damp in the morning. Luckily I had lots of sunshine instead of another day of rainy hiking in my wet clothes.

Ridgerunners Linus and Mike

Ridgerunners Linus and Mike

I recently purchased a new pack (Osprey EXOS 48) with my gear discount and I love it. It performed flawlessly on it maiden voyage, and is super comfortable. I highly recommend it. Many thru hikers use it as a superlight pack, though at around 50 liters most use it for a few days out at at a time. I just needed a little extra space than I had before, and wanted it as well for its ‘airspeed’ suspension which allows your back to be ventilated as well as the ‘stow and go’ trekking pole loops. Those were super convenient for the scrambles and the flats where I didn’t want or need the poles.

All in all the trip was a great success. I stuck it out through some very bad conditions. It’s great to know you have the skills to persevere and make proper judgement calls in inclement, dangerous weather. And I was rewarded with a perfect day the second day.

Linus, Jodi and Brian on Bear Mtn summit

Linus, Jodi and Brian on Bear Mtn summit

I am still a year-round volunteer so you will likely still see me out there either patrolling (volunteer ridgerunning) or doing improvements to the CT section as part of a work party. I love fall and spring hiking as well, and the woods are my happy place. I plan to return as a weekend ridgerunner in the 2018 season if they’ll have me.  I hope to see you out there soon. In the meantime, Fielden Stream and I have section hikes planned with friends in New Jersey and Massachusetts in the coming weeks so look for reports on those adventures.

Miles day 1: 7.6

Miles day 2: 6

– Linus

Appalachian Trail: MA Sections 4 & 5

Last weekend Fielden Stream and I did another overnighter in Massachusetts. We did all of section 5 and about 1/3 of section 4, as we traversed the eastern flank of October Mountain State forest. Once again the cookie lady shuttled us, up from Lee to near the Dalton line on Blotz rd. The first day we did 5.4 to October Mountain shelter. We stayed with a great group of thru and section hikers and the rain held off until bed time. There was lots of mud so I dubbed the area “Mud-se-chusetts”. The next day we did 7.2 back to our car in Lee. There weren’t many views but it was nice and cooler in the morning and in the shade of the dense forest here. Red efts (salamanders) were out in force as were the indian pipe plants.

We did pass one pond which was tempting to dip in but a big lunch and a beer in town was more tempting, so we pushed on. We summitted 3 peaks on day 2: Bald Top, Walling Mountain and Beckett Mountain. With the exception of Walling Mountain, both were much easier summits from the north. Bald top was the only one with a semi-view but it was no longer bald and mostly grown in. As we reached the end in Lee, we ran into two hikers I met when ridgerunning in Connecticut last weekend which was cool! This is the last section we will do southbound in Massachusetts.

I have one more ridgerunner weekend in Connecticut over Labor day, then we start New Jersey with friends the following weekend. Then Fielden and I will do a day hike in Massachusetts with some other friends who have a house up there, and complete section 4 into Dalton with them. (We saved the section 4 view for that hike).

In October we will do the next section north in Cheshire to the bottom of Mt. Greylock. After that, it’s back to Jersey unless we have a very unseasonably warm weekend in early November. But even if so we will probably save the last 17 miles of Massachusetts for a 2 nighter in late spring early summer 2018 and do more of Jersey as it will be about 10-15 degrees warmer.

Photos below.

Miles day 1: 5.4

Miles day 2: 7.2

– Linus

Waiting for our ride

Waiting for our ride

Fielden Stream coming through a mini ravine

Fielden Stream coming through a mini ravine

Hobble bush

Hobble bush

Trail sign at Washington Rd

Trail sign at Washington Rd

Some hikers had made a nice fire

Some hikers had made a nice fire

Post rain AM tent dry out

Post rain AM tent dry out

October Mtn Shelter

October Mtn Shelter

The Red Efts were everywhere!

The Red Efts were everywhere!

Looking up the not-so-bald Bald Top mtn

Looking up the not-so-bald Bald Top mtn

The more rare PINK Indian Pipe

The more rare PINK Indian Pipe

Linus on Becket Mtn 2200'

Linus on Becket Mtn 2200′

Don't see that everyday

Don’t see that everyday

Trail sign just north of Rt 20

Trail sign just north of Rt 20