Birthday Hike with my AMC Trail Friends

Yesterday I finally got back out on the trail, and with a whole crew of my favorite hiking people, less one: Fielden Stream. We had a very bad cold or possibly even the flu last week and as my fever was just breaking Friday (on my BIRTHDAY!), hers was just kicking in. So sadly she couldn’t join us for this one. I had set this up as a birthday celebration hike and while I wasn’t 100% yet I was also suffering some pretty bad cabin fever at this point after 3 days in bed.  I was well enough for a few hours of much needed nature healing with my friends!

It was originally planned as a short 3-miler, up to the south overlook on the New York side of Schaghticoke Mountain, and back down. While short, it’s a 1,000ft climb in 1.5 miles so its no walk in the park either!  Brian, Ray and Lisa joined me Sunday morning at the trailhead. Lisa brought along a new friend Emma, who is new to the area as of two years ago. She is originally from Iowa, with some years in Arizona as well. She made a nice addition to our little group, and is interested in future outings with us and getting involved in the club activities. So I guess we made a good impression!

The temperature hovered in the high 30’s but lower up top. We had a few small flurries as well during the day where the temperature was lower due to elevation or wind chill. There wasn’t much of any snow on the ground, but many parts of the trailway were runways of ice because the rain collects there, then freezes.

We had a nice break at the overlook and enjoyed some snacks and took some photos while exploring the winter scenery before heading back down.

When we got back down the mountain, a few of us wanted to keep going, and go down to the shelter and Ten Mile area. I had waited a month to hike, so even though I was not not planning on doing more than the first 3 miles, this portion is low elevation and not challenging, and the views are amazing.  So I was easily pursuaded and Lisa, Brian and I continued along for a few more hours/miles. I also really wanted to hit my 1,000 mile milestone. I’ve tracked every hike since I started hiking again in late 2013, and at the beginning of the hike I had only 7 miles to go on the counter to hit 1,000. Technically, I did have a few hikes over the years where the tracker dropped the signal and some miles so I may have hit it already, but not on paper! I only needed 3.7 more miles from the bottom of the mountain, and that was easy with this loop down to the shelter and campsites. More fun, AND a big milestone? Double bonus!

The river was flowing even more intensely than my last hike here at the very beginning of the month with Crista.  Many areas of the river beaches were sheets of ice, but our microspikes solved that problem! We had a great hike, and it was a very special way to celebrate my birthday with friends. I just wish my wife could have joined.

I got a hammock system for my birthday on Friday, and am excited to try hanging for the first time this season. Sadly, it will be a bit of a wait until I can do that, but I will write all about it when I finally get to try it! The 2019 WhiteBlaze guide I ordered also arrived on my birthday which was happy timing!

I am also picking some other gear I have been wanting for the new season – a rain kilt (pants are way too sweaty and soak you from the inside as well) and leukotape (better than moleskin!). I might invest in a wider Ti pot as well for my cook kit. Stay tuned. Photos below.

Miles: 7

  • Linus
Making Plans for 2019!

Making Plans for 2019!

Housatonic under Bulls Bridge

Housatonic under Bulls Bridge

Icy glacial erratics on Schaghticoke mtn

Icy glacial erratics on Schaghticoke mtn

Me and My AMC trail friends on top of Schaghticoke mtn

Me and My AMC trail friends on top of Schaghticoke mtn

CT AMC at Ten Mile River shelter

CT AMC at Ten Mile River shelter

Finally hit this milestone!

Finally hit this milestone!

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Appalachian Trail Connecticut: Bulls Bridge to Ten Mile Hill Loop

Last weekend I finally got back out on the A.T., and brought along a good friend of mine, Crista. She and I are in a band together, and we’ve been talking about doing a hike for about a year and we just never were able to coordinate it until now. Several of my friends in our AMC chapter were trying to get together with me to hike over the weekend but it worked out that they all had to go Saturday. When Crista reached out that she was free and looking to hike on Sunday, it was a done deal! We have both had a pretty tumultuous year with family and personal matters. So as usual, the trail provided the necessary therapy.

It was a great hike, and I counted almost 50 others enjoying the trail in the 3 hours we were out there. There had been some light snow in the morning but it stopped before we arrived and the temperatures warmed up to around 40. The spikes stayed in the car. We enjoyed a snack on top of Ten Mile Hill, and a break at the shelter. The Ten Mile and Housatonic Rivers were raging from the winter run off, and we saw some kayakers braving the rapids where the trail follows the river. They knew what they were doing!  We look forward to hiking again this season, and maybe her and her kids joining me on an overnight.

I am gearing up for another big year. I managed 239 miles in 2018, my annual personal best to date. This season Fielden Stream and I plan to finish the last 18 miles of New Jersey, and then start Vermont or Pennsylvania. I have also been signed up again as a weekend ridge runner for the season. And last but not least, I am also dreaming up some big solo hike plans, if I can work out the time off in this new year. Photos from the hike below.

Miles: 5

  • Linus
Bandmates on the Anderson Bridge

Bandmates on the Anderson Bridge

Frosty blazes

Frosty blazes

Ten Mile Hill

Ten Mile Hill

On Top of Ten Mile Hill

On Top of Ten Mile Hill

Frosty Lichens

Frosty Lichens

The Raging Housatonic

The Raging Housatonic

Mattabessett/New England Trail, Net50 Challenge Completion

On Saturday I hit the New England Trail once again with my brother. While I never managed to get out there over the Thanksgiving holiday, this past Saturday was a beautiful day for a hike. Temps hovered around 45 and felt warmer on the exposed rocks. It was clear, dry and visibility was grand. We could see all the way north to Hartford and south to Hamden and Sleeping Giant, West to the Hanging Hills of Meriden and East to The Connecticut River Valley. This was also the last hike I needed to complete the New England Trail 50 challenge. You can achieve it in a variety of ways, including hikes, volunteering, overnights on the trail, advocacy, donations to trail organizations, and social media sharing to raise awareness on the trail. It has been a lot of fun and I am glad to have helped in any way I could to raise awareness of the trail, and celebrate the 50th anniversary of the National Trails Act.

After a slightly sketchy crossing of the outlet of the Hubbard Reservoir at the start (did manage to sink a foot into the cold water a bit), the ascent up Chauncey Peak was quick, and easier thanks to a series of new switchbacks. These are also to benefit the hillside as the very steep original route contributes to erosion. The top of the ridgeline criss-crosses from the western to the eastern edge, where a large quarry operation exists. While that view wasn’t as scenic due to the mining site, there were still nice views beyond. And the western facing ridgeline walks were the real treat, with more of the dramatic basalt (trap rock) ledges to explore and trace as you make your way north , with Lamentation mountain just to the west and the Hubbard Reservoir directly below between the two mountains.

After descending the mountain, the trail winds through some rolling hills in the northern end of Giuffrida park, and then a lovely Hemlock forest before a short road walk (with great views of Chauncey Peak) over to the Highland Pond Preserve which makes up the last of the wooded portion of this section. The last 1.4 miles of this hike was along the paved Country Club road, but this is already an improvement as it used to be almost twice as much of a road walk before they got the portion through the forest and the preserve added in the last few years. Its great to see the hard work of trail organizations, continuing to work on improving trail conditions and acquiring new land for the trail. This is another reason why it’s a pleasure doing volunteer work myself with the AMC, because I experience the joy first-hand.

Now that I’ve completed the challenge, I want to get back to more of my favorite trail – the Appalachian Trail! But I also plan to finish the last 11 miles of the Mohawk trail In the coming months, as well as doing more hikes on the New England trail. I’d like to finish off the Mattabessett section next. I hope to have my brother along on those hikes as the location is central for both of us, and we have a lot of fun hiking together. Photos below.

Miles : 5.7

– Linus

Ascending Chauncey Peak

Ascending Chauncey Peak

My brother near the peak

My brother near the peak

Linus on the summit looking southwest to Sleeping Giant

Linus on the summit looking southwest to Sleeping Giant

My brother and I goofing around on Chauncey Peak

My brother and I goofing around on Chauncey Peak

View of Hubbard Resevoir and Lamentation Mountain beyond

View of Hubbard Resevoir and Lamentation Mountain beyond

Beautiful Hemlock forest

Beautiful Hemlock forest

Entering Highland Pond Preserve

Entering Highland Pond Preserve

Highland Pond Preserve

Highland Pond Preserve

 

Metacomet/New England Trail, Penwood State Forest, Connecticut

Trap Rock cairns`

Trap Rock cairns

About 2 weeks ago I got in another hike on the New England Trail (NET), in my quest to complete the NET 50 challenge. My brother joined me again and we took part in a led group hike through Penwood State Forest, using both the New England Trail and the orange and yellow trails to complete the loop. We completed all but about 2 miles of the complete NET section through Penwood S.F., and will be back to complete the rest.

One of the observation towers

One of the observation towers

In this area of the state this part of the New England Trail is made up of the Metacomet trail. This section is the one just north of Talcott Mountain, which features a popular trail destination, Heublin Tower.

It was cold and overcast when we met the hike leader Mat in the lot. His company is called “Reach Your Summit,” and I had actually met him a few years previous on the exciting St. John’s Ledges, on the Connecticut portion of the Appalachian Trail. We caught up a bit and when we had the full group assembled, we headed up the trail. It was just Mat, a retired state trooper (who I think I’ve also hiked with before – she seemed familiar), and us.

Lake Louise

Lake Louise

Mat was full of knowledge on the park founder Curtis H. Veeder and the park history, and we stopped at many of the observation towers or remnants he created when it was his land. We stopped at lake Louise as well which was flooding over the trail in a few spots including the dock, though we were able to walk out on it safely. We saw where Veeder formerly had his cabin overlooking the lake as well. There were some nice ridge walk views along the orange trail heading back but the best view was the spot known as the Pinnacle, on the NET portion.

Climbing the "Stairway to heaven"

Climbing the “Stairway to heaven”

There’s a wonderful, expansive view of the Heublin Tower, and the ridges of the Metacomet trail south of here. A brisk swirling wind kicked up as we reached the summit, as well as snow squalls. Not an hour sooner had I told Matt about my hike on the ridgelines of Mt. Higby in a snowstorm a few years back! I guess I jinxed it. That was our first snow of the season, and I drove through a few more squalls on the way back home. Nothing really stuck to the ground so it was no big deal.

All in all it was a 6.5 mile loop, and as connector trails are included in the challenge, I’m a bit closer now to completion! I’ve enjoyed using the challenge to explore more of this great new National Scenic trail. It really has many great views, and challenging terrain in spots. It just needs more overnight sites to facilitate thru hikes, and I know those will eventually come.

Me and my bro on the Pinnacle

Me and my bro on the Pinnacle

I was hoping to get out on the trails again over the holiday weekend but with all the family visiting I did not get a chance. I definitely plan to this weekend, and am aiming for one of two short sections left on the western spur of the Mattabessett section of the New England trail.

Miles: 6.5

  • Linus

Appalachian and Mt. Tammany Trails, Delaware Water Gap

Last weekend we hiked in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation area again, completing a 1.5 mile section of the New Jersey A.T to just beyond the Pennsylvania border, and throwing in a climb up Mt. Tammany for some views. Mt Tammany is one of the two main peaks at the Gap, but is not on the Appalachian Trail like its neighbor across the river in Pennsylvania, Mt. Minsi. I did wonder many times during the hike if it used to be, as the views are remarkable. To summit Mt. Tammany its a 3.4 mile loop off the A.T. in the Dunnfield Creek area of DWG.

Because Saturday was a lot of heavy rain and wind, we did just a day hike on Sunday and dropped into Mohican Outdoor Center on Saturday to revisit some fond memories of our section hike through there last fall with our friends.  But also because of the bad weather Saturday, and peak fall foliage in the area, the trail, and especially the parking lots, were overcrowded beyond belief on this gorgeous fall Sunday. It seemed everyone in the state came to hike there that day, and it is one of the most popular hikes in the state because of the views.

There are a LOT of rocks on the loop but nothing too difficult, and despite the crowds, we really enjoyed the scenery. We started the hike on the Pennsylvania side at the Mt. Minsi Appalachian Trail parking lot, doing a lollipop hike over to the Tammany Loop and back. So half the walk was on roads, and a noisy bridge. But even that section had its own nice scenery, and the N.J./PA official crossing.

We now have two 9-mile sections to finish in New Jersey and then we can call that state complete. We plan to finish these in the spring as season warm-up overnights, and then move on to either Maryland, Pennsylvania, or Vermont next. Photos below.

Miles: 7.4

– Linus

Crossing the Delaware on Rt 80

Crossing the Delaware on Rt 80

A waterfall on Mt Minsi

A waterfall on Mt Minsi

 

Mt. Tammany in the distance

Mt. Tammany in the distance

Up the Tammany Trail

Up the Tammany Trail

First amazing view from Mt. Tammany

First amazing view from Mt. Tammany

Mt Minsi beyond from Mt Tammany

Mt Minsi beyond from Mt Tammany

Fielden Stream on Mt Tammany

Fielden Stream on Mt Tammany

Goofy Linus

Goofy Linus

Fielden Stream at the NJ/PA A.T. border

Fielden Stream at the NJ/PA A.T. border

Dunnfield Creek

Dunnfield Creek

Re-Visiting Mohican Outdoor Center

Re-Visiting Mohican Outdoor Center

Ridgerunner Weekend #5, Ten Mile River Area, South Kent, CT

Housatonic Overlook on Herrick Trail

Housatonic Overlook on Herrick Trail

My last summer seasonal ridge runner weekend was over the October 14th weekend. It ended up that I just went out on the Sunday for the day.  I met up with my buddy Ray from our Connecticut AMC chapter. We walked down to the Ten Mile River shelter and campsites from the Bulls Bridge trailhead and found plenty of issues. Both bear boxes were left open, one filled with bags of food trash.

Clearing illegal fire ring

Clearing illegal fire ring

At the shelter was left a whole onion, and a cast iron pot which was clearly used to cook in the night before. All of these things are an open invitation to wildlife, even in daylight. This then becomes a danger for humans, and a danger for the wildlife.

It is known that a boy scout troop was there the night before. I’d just like to reiterate that as scouts you and especially your leaders are responsible for following and teaching leave no trace. Had I had the chance to encounter them I would have gone through this in person but please, we all must follow these rules.  I also found 2 fire pits behind the shelter, with beer cans and tinfoil.

Moss and Nightcrawlers

Moss and Nightcrawlers

Ray packed out the trash and iron pot while I continued my walk up to Ten Mile Summit and the Housatonic Overlook. And I cleaned up the firepits on the way back and checked the privies for issues.

The more people break the rules and risk the delicate agreement between private landowners along the trail perimeter, the more the very trail is put at risk. Please follow the rules. As a former scout, it breaks my heart to think there might be leaders out there willingly breaking leave no trace rules but also teaching scouts that this is acceptable behavior. It’s not.

Me and Ray, CT AMC pals

Me and Ray, CT AMC pals

Enjoy nature. Take only pictures, leave only footprints.

Lecture over. Happy trails

Miles: 5

Mt Tom State Reservation, New England/Metacomet-Manondnock Trail, Massachusetts

Easthampton from the trail

Easthampton from the trail

Last weekend we were in the Berkshires to celebrate Fielden Stream’s birthday with friends at their lake house.  While the girls were off enjoying a Yoga and meditation retreat, I headed for the mountains once again. The goal this time was to check out the Mount Tom State Reservation for the first time. In the process, I could also contribute towards my miles for the #Hike50Net challenge. This is the challenge to accumulate 50 points in the calendar year on the New England National Scenic Trail by a combination of hiked miles, sharing images, writing Hike-u’s and volunteering.

Walking among the ledges

Walking among the ledges

As you may remember I brought my brother out on part of the Mattabessett trail section in Connecticut earlier this summer. Here in Massachusetts the N.E.T is comprised of the Metacomet and Manondnock trails, stretching from the Massachusetts state line to its finale atop Mt. Manodnock on the New Hampshire border.

As I didn’t have anyone along with me or a shuttle arranged, i did an out-and-back from the south side of the park, so I will have to go back another time and do the same from the north end to complete the section sometime in the future.  No problem. Not only should it be an easy one to convince someone to come along on just for the views, but its no more than five miles out and back from the north end so not too bad mileage-wise either.

Plenty of scrambles

Plenty of scrambles

There seems to have been some re-routing off the road which wasn’t on my map, but to make sure I was sticking on the route in my tracker, I did the .4 road walk at the beginning and end. I see now why it was re-routed, but it was also much further into the woods in that area, and I had limited time.

It was a very steep climb up from the base of Mt. Tom to the summit, over a mile of loose, basalt scree. Basalt is the red volcanic rock prevalent along this trail’s ridgelines. It was slow going both up and down the big climb for this reason. I realize it probably helps prevent erosion, but it felt like being on roller skates sometimes. There were not many switchbacks to ease the ascent, but fortunately it was only about 7-800ft tops.

Name that flower

Name that flower

Once at the summit of Mt. Tom, there were many hikers enjoying the long views in all directions. This used to be a ski area when I was a kid and I remember seeing its trails lit up for night skiing whenever we would pass it on 91 north on our way to Vermont. There are a bunch of large radio towers up there as well as old foundations for the ski lifts and infrastructure. I don’t know if there are any old ski buildings left on the other side. I believe they have a winter park there for tubing and such, so they may have left the lodge.

The NET follows the western ridge so this was the steep side with no trails. There are trails that go along the front and I imagine there are traces left of the ski trails. At some point I will do those as I would be interested to see that. I never did ski there, which is a shame.

The trail along the ledges

The trail along the ledges

For the entire ridge line, the trail hugs the cliff edges, with the occasional dip back into the woods here and there. But this was not to ease an ascent or descent – there were plenty of those along the steep ledges. This is similar to the sections in Connecticut as well, so it was not new for me by any means. These trails are where I cut my teeth and faced my fears in preparation for similar terrain on the Appalachian Trail. The basalt however is looser and broken in many places, making it all the more important to take your time.

It was encouraging to me to realize that over the miles of cliff walks I needed to do on this hike, I have come a long way in facing my fear of such things, and it made me feel strong and confident. I hiked over three peaks and back: Mt. Tom, Deadtopp, and Whiting Peak. Next time I will conquer the remaining three in the range from the northern end.

Ledges with the Oxbow beyond

Ledges with the Oxbow beyond

Another highlight was I was able to view the Oxbow in the famous Thomas Cole painting from the ledges. That painting was actually made from the ledges of nearby Mount Holyoke in Northampton, however.  You can see it in the last photo.

Miles: 6.6

(with a short .4 out and back in the wrong direction at the start!)

— Linus