Metacomet/New England Trail, Penwood State Forest, Connecticut

Trap Rock cairns`

Trap Rock cairns

About 2 weeks ago I got in another hike on the New England Trail (NET), in my quest to complete the NET 50 challenge. My brother joined me again and we took part in a led group hike through Penwood State Forest, using both the New England Trail and the orange and yellow trails to complete the loop. We completed all but about 2 miles of the complete NET section through Penwood S.F., and will be back to complete the rest.

One of the observation towers

One of the observation towers

In this area of the state this part of the New England Trail is made up of the Metacomet trail. This section is the one just north of Talcott Mountain, which features a popular trail destination, Heublin Tower.

It was cold and overcast when we met the hike leader Mat in the lot. His company is called “Reach Your Summit,” and I had actually met him a few years previous on the exciting St. John’s Ledges, on the Connecticut portion of the Appalachian Trail. We caught up a bit and when we had the full group assembled, we headed up the trail. It was just Mat, a retired state trooper (who I think I’ve also hiked with before – she seemed familiar), and us.

Lake Louise

Lake Louise

Mat was full of knowledge on the park founder Curtis H. Veeder and the park history, and we stopped at many of the observation towers or remnants he created when it was his land. We stopped at lake Louise as well which was flooding over the trail in a few spots including the dock, though we were able to walk out on it safely. We saw where Veeder formerly had his cabin overlooking the lake as well. There were some nice ridge walk views along the orange trail heading back but the best view was the spot known as the Pinnacle, on the NET portion.

Climbing the "Stairway to heaven"

Climbing the “Stairway to heaven”

There’s a wonderful, expansive view of the Heublin Tower, and the ridges of the Metacomet trail south of here. A brisk swirling wind kicked up as we reached the summit, as well as snow squalls. Not an hour sooner had I told Matt about my hike on the ridgelines of Mt. Higby in a snowstorm a few years back! I guess I jinxed it. That was our first snow of the season, and I drove through a few more squalls on the way back home. Nothing really stuck to the ground so it was no big deal.

All in all it was a 6.5 mile loop, and as connector trails are included in the challenge, I’m a bit closer now to completion! I’ve enjoyed using the challenge to explore more of this great new National Scenic trail. It really has many great views, and challenging terrain in spots. It just needs more overnight sites to facilitate thru hikes, and I know those will eventually come.

Me and my bro on the Pinnacle

Me and my bro on the Pinnacle

I was hoping to get out on the trails again over the holiday weekend but with all the family visiting I did not get a chance. I definitely plan to this weekend, and am aiming for one of two short sections left on the western spur of the Mattabessett section of the New England trail.

Miles: 6.5

  • Linus
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Appalachian and Mt. Tammany Trails, Delaware Water Gap

Last weekend we hiked in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation area again, completing a 1.5 mile section of the New Jersey A.T to just beyond the Pennsylvania border, and throwing in a climb up Mt. Tammany for some views. Mt Tammany is one of the two main peaks at the Gap, but is not on the Appalachian Trail like its neighbor across the river in Pennsylvania, Mt. Minsi. I did wonder many times during the hike if it used to be, as the views are remarkable. To summit Mt. Tammany its a 3.4 mile loop off the A.T. in the Dunnfield Creek area of DWG.

Because Saturday was a lot of heavy rain and wind, we did just a day hike on Sunday and dropped into Mohican Outdoor Center on Saturday to revisit some fond memories of our section hike through there last fall with our friends.  But also because of the bad weather Saturday, and peak fall foliage in the area, the trail, and especially the parking lots, were overcrowded beyond belief on this gorgeous fall Sunday. It seemed everyone in the state came to hike there that day, and it is one of the most popular hikes in the state because of the views.

There are a LOT of rocks on the loop but nothing too difficult, and despite the crowds, we really enjoyed the scenery. We started the hike on the Pennsylvania side at the Mt. Minsi Appalachian Trail parking lot, doing a lollipop hike over to the Tammany Loop and back. So half the walk was on roads, and a noisy bridge. But even that section had its own nice scenery, and the N.J./PA official crossing.

We now have two 9-mile sections to finish in New Jersey and then we can call that state complete. We plan to finish these in the spring as season warm-up overnights, and then move on to either Maryland, Pennsylvania, or Vermont next. Photos below.

Miles: 7.4

– Linus

Crossing the Delaware on Rt 80

Crossing the Delaware on Rt 80

A waterfall on Mt Minsi

A waterfall on Mt Minsi

 

Mt. Tammany in the distance

Mt. Tammany in the distance

Up the Tammany Trail

Up the Tammany Trail

First amazing view from Mt. Tammany

First amazing view from Mt. Tammany

Mt Minsi beyond from Mt Tammany

Mt Minsi beyond from Mt Tammany

Fielden Stream on Mt Tammany

Fielden Stream on Mt Tammany

Goofy Linus

Goofy Linus

Fielden Stream at the NJ/PA A.T. border

Fielden Stream at the NJ/PA A.T. border

Dunnfield Creek

Dunnfield Creek

Re-Visiting Mohican Outdoor Center

Re-Visiting Mohican Outdoor Center