Tyringham Cobble Appalachian Trail Loop

 

Fielden Stream at the trailhead

Fielden Stream at the trailhead

Well, when life hands you lemons, make lemonade! That’s what we did last weekend. We had our first backpacking trip of the year together planned for Friday the 5th. Leading up to that day It was perfect hiking weather. Not too hot, a light breeze to keep the bugs away, sunshine…  And then, you know how it goes. You find out days before there will be some rain. Ok, no problem, we’ve hiked and camped in rain many times. Its part of the fun. But then you hear the system is a really big one, having left tornadoes and major flooding in its wake as it blasted northeastward to us. Inches of rain predicted, for a full day of relentless downpour.

Signs signs everywhere signs

Signs signs everywhere signs

Now we’ve been caught in that many times. Just the week before I was caught in a thunderstorm on Sharon Mountain in Connecticut while doing some trail work with a friend from the club.  Once you’re out there, there ain’t much you can do but soldier on through it. Or get off the trail for a day and wait out the misery if its really necessary. But when you haven’t left yet, there’s room for modifications. Why be miserable if you don’t have to be.  I honestly don’t mind a lot of rain if its the middle of summer. But when temperatures are in the 40’s and 50’s, that’s when hypothermia can really be a risk.

We were planning to do the first section of New Jersey southbound.  I have a friend that lives near Vernon and was going to shuttle us and we picked the direction so that we were going to go down the infamous “Stairway to Heaven” on Wawayanda mountain. While that didn’t sound really fun to go up in the pouring rain, coming down was probably even more dangerous.  Time for a new plan. Even many of the thrus we were following on YouTube were opting for a zero mile day In town or at camp.

Bunny rock, Tyringham loop trail

Bunny rock, Tyringham loop trail

We re-focused our attention on Massachusetts where we left off there last year, and I looked into some nice day hike options in the area where we could do some of the A.T. and get some views but also could do some other relaxing things like stay in a favorite inn and luxuriate a little. We love the Red Lion in Stockbridge, so we got a great off-season rate room there and spent the drive up stopping into shops and taking our time. We arrived at the Inn for a great lunch in their tavern. The Inn goes back hundreds of years and was a carriage stop where the likes of George Washington stayed. I’m assuming this was on the route from Boston to Albany, now the nearby Massachusetts turnpike. This town also is the location of the Alice’s Restaurant song, and where Norman Rockwell began a long illustrious career.

Views from the Western shoulder

Views from the Western shoulder

I picked the loop of the Cobble and Appalachian trails in nearby Tyringham. While not a very high peak, Tyringham Cobble’s rocky top (where the word Cobble comes from in mountain lingo) provides a wide scenic view of the valley below, once farmed by the Shakers when Tyringham was called Jerusalem. Its about a 2.1 mile loop over the cobble in this state reservation and really not challenging at all. But it was perfect for the occasion and we had planned to hike it that day still should the rain let up a bit. It didn’t do that until dark. So as the rain kept pouring down, we headed to the Norman Rockwell museum to see his artwork as well as an exhibit on the cartoons of our childhood by Hannah-Barbera. It was a treat, and the Rockwell pieces were moving as well. They had brought his final studio from its former location onto this location a few miles away, and overlooking another scenic vista. Everything in the studio had been left exactly as he did.

I'm a ham

I’m a ham

We headed back to our Inn for some lazy time and then visited a local sushi restaurant and then saw some local talent in the pub in the basement.

The rain stopped around dinner time and I lamented a bit that we could have hit the trail late and hiked in to camp. But we were having a nice time. And even though the rain stopped, everything would be soaked when we went to set up camp in puddles. And, the hike out would be about 9 miles if we wanted to finish the section still, and we would not have had time for as we had to head home by 2.  Still, my heart is on the trail so In the future, I am just going to have the gear in the trunk in case things change on a dime again.  We’ve shot ourselves in the foot before doing the same thing only to have the rain stop well before predicted.

Hemlock grove

Hemlock grove

We had a nice breakfast at the local cafe after checking out and headed for the park. Some new storm clouds were moving through and the skies over Beartown forest were dark for a bit. But as we arrived, the clouds began to move. We hiked up the loop trail as the sun began to show. On this side of the loop there is a great view of the valley from a rock affectionately known as ‘bunny rock’. It is a a glacial erratic between the trail and the farmland beyond. Everywhere along this trail were special gates that livestock could not open. It began to then climb through Hemlock stands until reaching the grassy spine of the mountain’s eastern shoulder. We ran into three different thru hikers coming down the hill on the A.T. almost immediately. They did look a little damp and grumpy so to made me feel a bit better about not doing the overnight! The third one I stopped to ask if he knew one of the thru hikers I was watching, who had gone through the area just a day before and who I was sad we would be missing running into today. He didn’t know him but we had a nice brief exchange of words before heading to the summit.

I love this sloping hill

I love this sloping hill

We passed a family with their kids and dogs who went the other way around the loop and made it to the summit just in time for our own private visit there. We had a snack, took in the gorgeous views, and then followed the trail down into another hemlock stand on the west side of the mountain. When it was time to branch off the A.T. back on to the loop Traill my heart and legs tugged at me a bit, wanting to keep following the white blazes. But I knew we’d regroup shortly and I was already planning another first backpacking trip together for June.

If interested, the Exhibit runs through 5/29

If interested, the Exhibit runs through 5/29

I am going to be up here again in early June in a more official capacity so Fielden Stream is going to come with, and after the necessary meetings are done I am going to have a friend in the club help us drop our car and shuttle us back to Tyringham so we can cover the Beartown state forest section we had just skipped for this short day hike excursion.  I am hoping it won’t rain cats and dogs again for 12 hours straight, but this time we should have warmer temps, longer days, and a bit more resolve. I’d like to try and finish Massachusetts this season but with all my official trail commitments we may not until next summer.  That’s ok, with another 2,000 miles to go, what’s the hurry?

This hike is great for families with little kids or big kids alike. Its not difficult, its very scenic, and its close to many picturesque New England towns and other great hikes like nearby Monument Mountain and Laura’s tower.

Miles: 2.1

— Linus

Advertisements

A Day in the Life of a Trail Patroller: Campsite Cleanups, Sharon, CT

Climbing Sharon Mtn

Climbing Sharon Mtn

As the season ramps up, I’m finding more work to be done in terms of cleanup as well as more prep on my part to be in my best shape for the longer days and hikes ahead. I filled the gap between the last patrol hike and this one with a quick hike at a local nature preserve near home, which has some nice historical artifacts to add another layer to the appeal of the hike. I am a history buff as well. I just bought the book “Hiking through history: Civil War sites on the Appalachian Trail” and am really looking forward to reading it. That was one of my favorite parts of hiking through Harper’s Ferry, though the trail itself through there is also very beautiful.

Steep ridgelines

Steep ridgelines

On this day I was planning to cover a section just north from last time. I had suggested this and one other option to my crew leader as places I was considering to get out and do any cleanup necessary. He had responded that this area hadn’t been walked over lately so it was settled. My friend in the AMC, Chilly Cheeks, joined me again and we started the hike just a few trail miles north of our last outing to Pine Swamp Brook shelter and campsites. We were considering NOBO vs SOBO but as I was feeling under the weather from a recent cold going around my family, and she having had a late night, we opted for NOBO as the large elevation change would be a long descent at the end  rather than kicking off with a huge ascent. There were still plenty of ups. There always is.

At Sharon Mtn Campsites

At Sharon Mtn Campsites

There was a forecast for some possible rain but I didn’t really know how it was going to play out… do we ever? Oh so many times I’ve re-worked or canceled a hike due to rain only to find it tapered off and moved on through quicker than expected. More on that to come…

We left one car at the end of the hike in Falls Village, and it turns out our overseer of trails was there too preparing to do the same hike (though the full section) with his chainsaw to cut any problem blow downs. He shuttled down to where we started the section a few weeks ago at West Cornwall Road.

Our path behind us

Our path behind us

As we already cleaned up the campsite at Pine Swamp recently, we drove the second car up Mt Easter road to where the trail crosses near the summit and parked the second car there. This did save us several uphills which was nice but really the point was to be closer to the first of the two campsites as we had a limited amount of time as well.

The trail climbs pretty quickly up to the summit of Mt. Easter, and I recalled my notorious mud wasp sting here two years ago as well as the large slabs of pink marble all along the trail near the summit.

Hang Glider View, Taconics beyond

Hang Glider View, Taconics beyond

Chilly cheeks enjoyed the mud wasp tale and we arrived at the summit view which is somewhat grown in. Though when in winter, you can see the peaks of the Catskills. While I love a good view, I also understand that we can’t clearcut large areas of forest everywhere there’s a potential nice view.

Not long after the Mt. Easter summit we passed a group of 4 backpackers who were section hiking and said our greetings. There was an adult and a few teenagers or college aged kids so I’m assuming a father and kids. We then reached Sharon Mountain campsite and immediately saw some issues. There was a campsite that had a fire ring, as well as a shirt left hanging on a tree nearby. Surely we all know the rules of pack it in, pack it out. And with almost no leaf cover yet and the shirt being bright white, there was no missing this. In fact we saw it from 20 feet away as we approached the camp site. This is blatant disregard for nature and the rules of the trail.

Chilly Cheeks climbing some beautiful stairs on Sharon Mtn

Chilly Cheeks climbing some beautiful stairs on Sharon Mtn

Sadly so many hikers are either entitled or blissfully ignorant and so cleaning this up becomes someone else’s job. Fire rings also always come with foil or some other kind of trash in the ashes. Folks, you need a much hotter fire to melt metal, and even if you could it would just liquify the metal which would then melt onto the earth leaving a different but just as ugly mark on the landscape.

We cleared the ring and took the shirt and other trash and checked the other campsites. As we were walking out of the campsite and starting our next climb over the undulating ridges and peaks of Sharon Mountain, we heard it. We heard it several more times as well. Loud thunder.

Belter's Campsites

Belter’s Campsites

The darkening skies had given us some expectation things might get wet, but now it was definite. Ironically this is also the same spot Fielden Stream and I began to get soaked on what would be a 6 mile slog in the rain 2 years ago. The rain began as we ascended to the first peak. Sharon Mountain is a very large landmass, similar to nearby Scaghticoke Mountain. There are many shoulders and peaks and the mountain reaches for miles in each direction. This entire section is pretty much Sharon Mountain, though Mt Easter is another summit that is encircled by and attached to this one.

Please don't

Please don’t

You can’t really tell the difference when hiking it other than its another peak. The first peak and in fact all of them are no more than a few hundred feet elevation gain but its the downs before each up that give you the roller coaster experience. Nonetheless, we both had our new raincoats and were eager to put them to the test. It wasn’t really cold, and we only had about 3 more miles to go today, with no significant rock scrambles. So there was no real concern. We just enjoyed it, its part of the experience.

We passed a few more section backpackers (everyone seemed to be headed south today) and as we reached the beautiful “Hang Glider view,” the rain subsided and we were treated to expanding views. At first we just saw the Lime Rock race track and nearby Gallows Hill.

Not a trash can

Not a trash can

We could hear the announcements as a rare cyclist race was going on (we followed their route to the track up and down rt 7 to and from our hike) and was we watched, the clouds and fog moved out and you could now see the entire Taconic Range beyond. Lion’s Head and Bear Mtn in CT, and Race, Everett, Bushnell and Jug End in Massachusetts. You could also see Prospect mountain and we remarked how we loved being able to trace the path of the trail in front or behind you as you progress on your hike.  We took pictures and had a quick snack, wary of a returning rainstorm.

We rode over two more ridges and got a few more ups and another route of the trail behind us. We stopped at a stream so I could show off my new water filter and system and camel up. I made multiple airplane references as we began our initial and final descents in to ‘the greater Falls Village area.” The descent into Belter’s Bump was through a beautiful Hemlock forest, though the destruction by the wooly algelid beetle was rampant. We reached Belters and found not only 3 different areas where campers had made fires, but one scattered with all sorts of trash.

On Belter's Bump looking East

On Belter’s Bump looking East

Large piece of wood from hazard trees we cut were partially or fully burned and one of the fire rings barely had any protection from the bed of pine needles all over the ground around it. These are extremely flammable. I can’t tell you how upset this made me, as this was not far from being another large brush fire on our trail. We found a nail on a tree with no sign which we are pretty certain was the stoves only no fire sign that used to be there. Likely burned as firewood. There are many that have a deep disrespect for nature, and for rules. Sometimes I wish you had to have a leave no trace class before you get to hike the A.T. There are already so many beautiful parks defaced by graffiti. And today’s generation of young hikers as well as many locals just feel like they can do whatever they want because they will never be back.

Crossing at 112/7 with Barrack Mtn Beyond

Crossing at 112/7 with Barrack Mtn Beyond

Anyway we cleaned up the trash and the fire evidence and took in one last view on Belter’s Bump. This is a smaller hill with a little rocky outcrop requiring one last up to a rewarding view of the peaks of the Mohawk Trail (formerly the old route of the A.T. here) to the east. As we descended we were glad we chose the direction we did and joked about nearby Barrack Mtn on the Mohawk and what a beast it is. We plan to conquer it this summer. The rain never did come back. We picked up the second car back atop Mt. Easter and headed home.

Folks, please respect the trail. Leave no trace. Pack out what you pack in. There will always be those of us there to clean up and protect the trail but we can’t be everywhere and its your personal responsibility. Just like at home.

Miles: 4.7

— Linus