Ridgerunner Weekend #6

Well it turns out they needed me for one more weekend and I was more than happy to go, with the great October weather. Well, I’m ALWAYS happy to go. The weather was in the 60s-70s all weekend, even if a little overcast. Lows were predicted in the mid-50s which is balmy for October, and I was thrilled to have my friend Brian along for the overnight to share hiking and camping stories until hiker midnight. The scouts were out in force, and we also had our annual CT AMC chapter Appalachian Trail day and picnic, so I got to spend a few hours with all of my favorite trail people, and make some new friends. Miles were low but morale and hiker numbers were high so I spent a lot of time interacting with hikers, scout troops and our great volunteers out doing their work parties on waterbars, invasive removal, and general cleanup. The foliage was really turning, so while I had to be a little more careful on the leaf-covered trail, the scenery was gorgeous.

I hope to get out one more time in November for an overnight with friends if the weather holds up.  The plan is the Mohawk trail. I just have to remember to fill out their backcountry camping permits!

Photos below.

Miles day 1: 6.6

Miles day 2: 5.1

  • Linus
    Frog hunting flies on Schaghticoke mtn

    Frog hunting flies on Schaghticoke mtn

    Autumn Sassafrass

    Autumn Sassafrass

    Linus and Brian on Scaghticoke Mtn

    Linus and Brian on Scaghticoke Mtn

    New blowdown art

    New blowdown art

    A fine cup of morning Joe

    A fine cup of morning Joe

    Home for the night

    Home for the night

    Selfie with the new hiker sculpture in Kent, CT

    Selfie with the new hiker sculpture in Kent, CT

    Ned Anderson Bridge, Ten Mile and Housatonic Rivers confluence

    Ned Anderson Bridge, Ten Mile and Housatonic Rivers confluence

    Nice new waterbar

    Nice new waterbar

    Wingdale, NY from Ten Mile Hill

    Wingdale, NY from Ten Mile Hill

    Ned Anderson Bridge and the Housatonic River

    Ned Anderson Bridge and the Housatonic River

    Foliage on display

    Foliage on display

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Ridgerunner Weekend #5 – Salisbury to Sages Ravine

No rain, no pain, no maine!

No rain, no pain, no maine!

This was my final weekend as a summer ridgerunner for the 2017 season, and it was full of excitement!  I knew there was rain in the forecast but wow did it rain. I hit the trail Sunday morning around 10am in Salisbury, headed for Sages Ravine just over the Massachusetts border; about 7 miles and change. It was raining when I drove up and raining when I started and raining when I got to Lion’s Head an hour later. It was raining hard. I know this is part of the job and I’ve been lucky considering this is the first day I was out in weather this bad the whole season. Lion’s head was completely socked in so there was no view. I pushed on to Riga shelter to take a snack break and get out of the rain for a bit and dry out my raincoat which was no match for this kind of rain and wet through partially in less than 1.5 hrs.  I called my friend Brian from the shelter to see if he could meet up to hike later while I had some trail mix and let the coat dry out. There was a tiny bit of a view at Riga but not much. Not the amazing normal view anyway.

the "trail" up Lion's Head

the “trail” up Lion’s Head

I set out about 30 minutes later when the rain diminished a bit. Often times the forecast says rain but the estimate is over what actually occurs. Not the case today. A few minutes after I hit the trail again the downpours continued. Luckily no one left me any trash at the shelter or in its bear box I had to carry out.

The trail was literally a river. There was no way, nor is it recommended, to walk around as there is laurel right up to the edge and doing so can damage them and the wildflowers along the edges. It was colder in the morning but by this point was in the low 60s so walking through them was just kinda like walking along the beach in boat shoes. Trail runners are great in this scenario though because the water flows right out and it was actually kind of refreshing. My only concern was swamp foot from hiking for hours with wet feet. I wasn’t hiking long enough for it to get that bad, thankfully.

Socked in Lion's Head "view"

Socked in Lion’s Head “view”

I made another stop at Brassie Brook shelter to take a bathroom break and spoke to a section hiker taking shelter under its roof. I had already seen about 14 backpackers braving the weather. After all, this weather is not all that uncommon for regular backpackers.  I was moving as fast as I could to get to camp and out of the rain. I was lucky enough to have been permitted use of the caretakers tent so I was looking forward to being able to set up and unpack without the rain bearing down on me. I would be luckier than most on this day.

The rainy "view" at Riga

The rainy “view” at Riga

I made the judgement call to take the Undermountain and Paradise Lane trails from Riga junction rather than go over the many steep and exposed rock faces on Bear mountain, particularly the north side. This added a mile but was far safer.  I need to get a new otter box because my phone was not responsive to my squishy wet fingers and the humidity also made it act up again like in Harpers Ferry in July.  Somewhere in the process of my mad 8 mile dash in the rain, I managed to jam my big toe so the bone feels bruised if not fractured (hopefully not). It hurts but is functional so hopefully it’s just bruising. All that rushing meant I made good time though and was at camp by 230.

A tent inside a tent

A tent inside a tent

When I arrived at the campsite, two hikers were in the caretakers tent drying out gear. This is not allowed, please don’t do this, the tent is for staff only. However given the horrible conditions, and the friendly nature of the two men, I allowed them time to pack up their wet things in the shelter of the tent and we chatted a while. I gave them some advice on the upcoming section as they wanted to push much farther, having zeroed most of the day waiting out the rain. As there are some precarious bits ahead, especially when wet, I let them know about the campsites before those areas should they need to pull back and wait out the rain again. And of course, the rain began again shortly after they left around 330. When it finally ended it was around 630-7. I enjoyed listening to it on the roof of the tent as I always do. I enjoyed it even more this time as I was finally out of the rain.

Exterior of caretaker's tent

Exterior of caretaker’s tent

Despite seeing a decent amount of backpackers on the trail, no one else came in to spend the night at the campsite. I was surprised as it’s a very popular one and there was a group there just the night before in addition to the two men I met. I think given the rain they all opted for a campsite with a shelter and a roof.

I had dinner and setup my small tent inside the large canvas tent, so I had effective bug protection. This was the final weekend for that tent so my coordinator informed me the bug net and cot were already packed and they’d be packing the tent the next day after I left.  So I was grateful to have access to it, even in its most minimal state. It did what I needed most, kept me dry!  I changed out of my wet clothes and hung everything to dry out the best they could.

Dawn at Sages Ravine

Dawn at Sages Ravine

I had managed to get a little reception on my phone by going up the hill so I did a round around the campsite and checked the privies, bear boxes and other tent sites and coordinated with Brian to meet him the next morning at the intersection of the A.T and the Northwest road. He and his friend were planning to hit the state high point on nearby Mt Frissell, so we planned to hike over Bear together and then they could do the Frissell trail next as it was right across the road from the Northwest road and Bear Mountain road where they’d come out.

Some screech owls and other critters lulled me off to sleep… sorta. I also read the register book to help!

Monday, Labor day, was a gorgeous one. And the challenging scramble up the north side of Bear was a lot more fun with friends. It was also mostly dry at that point being so exposed to the sun and so vertical. I made quick friends with Jodi, and we met the other ridgerunner I knew was also out for his final weekend as we neared the summit. We spent some time on the summit tower with some day hikers and then headed down the south side of Bear, with its great southern and western views. I pointed out Frissell to them and some of the other mountains on their next hike.

Linus and Jodi climbing the steep north side of Bear Mtn

Linus and Jodi climbing the steep north side of Bear Mtn

When we got to the trail junction for Bear Mountain road, we made plans to see each other at our CT chapter’s A.T. day in October,. exchanged photos and headed our separate ways. I made quick time to Lion’s head and remarked to myself how quickly all those rivers on the trail were already dried up.  I passed large numbers of day hikers and quite a few more backpackers. Everyone was out in force enjoying the gorgeous day. Funny, I had said “beautiful day isn’t it!” to all the hikers as a joke the day previous, and today it was in earnest. Lots of hikers had their dogs out with them, and one family at Lion’s head were visiting with their son for the first time since they had gotten engaged there. The warm, dry weather also allowed me to dry out my shoes, socks and clothes which I had to put on damp in the morning. Luckily I had lots of sunshine instead of another day of rainy hiking in my wet clothes.

Ridgerunners Linus and Mike

Ridgerunners Linus and Mike

I recently purchased a new pack (Osprey EXOS 48) with my gear discount and I love it. It performed flawlessly on it maiden voyage, and is super comfortable. I highly recommend it. Many thru hikers use it as a superlight pack, though at around 50 liters most use it for a few days out at at a time. I just needed a little extra space than I had before, and wanted it as well for its ‘airspeed’ suspension which allows your back to be ventilated as well as the ‘stow and go’ trekking pole loops. Those were super convenient for the scrambles and the flats where I didn’t want or need the poles.

All in all the trip was a great success. I stuck it out through some very bad conditions. It’s great to know you have the skills to persevere and make proper judgement calls in inclement, dangerous weather. And I was rewarded with a perfect day the second day.

Linus, Jodi and Brian on Bear Mtn summit

Linus, Jodi and Brian on Bear Mtn summit

I am still a year-round volunteer so you will likely still see me out there either patrolling (volunteer ridgerunning) or doing improvements to the CT section as part of a work party. I love fall and spring hiking as well, and the woods are my happy place. I plan to return as a weekend ridgerunner in the 2018 season if they’ll have me.  I hope to see you out there soon. In the meantime, Fielden Stream and I have section hikes planned with friends in New Jersey and Massachusetts in the coming weeks so look for reports on those adventures.

Miles day 1: 7.6

Miles day 2: 6

– Linus

Appalachian Trail: Shenandoah National Park and West Virginia

Appalachian Trail to High top

Appalachian Trail to High top

Just got back from my second ridgerunner weekend, and can’t wait to share it but first — the family went for a vacation in Virginia and West Virginia over the holiday. We visited places like Monticello, some great vineyards, and some great BBQ joints! But since this is a hiking blog I will stick to the hiking bits!

On High top

On High top

We did two hikes in Shenandoah National park, a favorite place of ours for sure. The first one we took the kids to was High top mountain, in the southern district close to where we were staying the first few days. It was a 1,000 foot climb from either side of Skyline drive. (at least the road did the other 2,500 feet!).

No bears!

No bears!

We set off late afternoon to avoid the scorching heat and catch the dusk. It was not easy, and since we started out from the wrong side we headed the wrong way into the woods which added 1 mile round trip before i realized when we weren’t climbing up the whole way!). But when we reached the top, everyone thought it was worth it. We took lots of pictures and enjoyed the views before returning the way we came. This is one of the less popular hikes but certainly a great one. It’s not really steep just consistently uphill the whole 1.7 miles. We all sang songs the whole way down which was a lot of fun and a little embarrassing when a thru hiker appeared just after us at Skyline drive!

the other black rock, Big Meadows

the other black rock, Big Meadows

A few days later as we were heading northwest to the town of Luray where we would stay for the next night and enjoy the fireworks, we passed through Thornton Gap in the central district and stopped at Skyland to have lunch and visit the gift shop before hitting Stony Man summit so my daughter could see one of the best views in the park. That’s a short easy hike from the wayside.

Jiffy Pop

Jiffy Pop

But then I heard from some of my hiker friends who were also down in SNP doing another section and they had already left Skyland for Big Meadows, 10 miles or so south. The restaurant at Skyland still wasn’t open for lunch for another 30 minutes so we decided to head down there so I could meet up with them for a bit and we’d be just in time for lunch there.

Rain dancer

Rain dancer

We got to the lodge and sat down for lunch including their famous blackberry ice cream. Only problem was the wayside restaurant was a mile down the road from the lodge restaurant. I waited 45 minutes before I realized they might not have a signal so I drove over to the wayside and caught them just as they were heading out. We talked for a bit, took some photos and I headed back to the lodge to finish lunch. But where to hike here? Do we go back to Stony man? I wanted a nice view and no one wanted a long hike today. Turns out there’s a .2 mile trail to a fantastic view right behind the lodge! They also call it black rock but it’s not the famous one farther south in the park. The view WAS fantastic and we really enjoyed the minimal effort and rewarding views today. Jiffy Pop really helped me push my fear limit a little and be a little more daring about where I’d stand on the ledge!

We had a great stay in Luray and Fielden Stream and I visited a local outfitter where I got some speed laces for my trail runners (the laces always come untied when hiking!) and we chatted with the friendly staff there.

Nature's bounty!

Nature’s bounty!

The next day we drove up to Harper’s Ferry and while we were going to hike the next day before we left, weather was moving in and I was worried no one would want to hike in a downpour. So we drove right to the trail head at Key’s Gap, for this easy 4.5 mile hike along .the ridge saddling the Virginia/West Virginia line and down so we could finish our West Virginia section. I arranged our shuttle with the awesome HalfApp shuttle, my friend and awesome artist Rhonda Adams.

Fielden stream at 4 mile campground

Fielden stream at 4 mile campground

There was an abundance of blackberries though most weren’t fully ripe we did pick out a few and it lifted energy levels and spirits right away. About half way, the possible light drizzle turned into a full downpour with thunder ! I was waiting for the complaints but everyone wanted it to cool things off, and my daughter even did a rain dance and wanted a new trail name so we dubbed her rain dancer! The trail became a river but the hiking while a a bit rocky was easy and we all had fun. We got picked up by Rhonda and she gave us some of her special A.T. art pieces she makes from wood and leather including a very special yo-yo she had 30 years and recently also painted and give to Jiffy Pop. We then went to the hotel to unwind before dinner at a fun hibachi place.

A happy soggy hiking family

A happy soggy hiking family

The next day it was still pouring so either way we would have been hiking in the rain. I was really pleased by their great attitude about it. We walked around Harper’s Ferry and visited the ATC headquarters, spoke with some of the great people that run the organization and bought a lot of merchandise which helps support the trail. Including a West Virginia patch which is now done and Massachusetts which will be soon!

It was a lot of great hikes and I am so glad we all got to do them all together. Jiffy Pop had been to both parks before and loved them and Rain Dancer also fell in love with them so I was a happy dad. I am going to take both kids out individually with me on an overnight later this summer up here in Connecticut, and Jiffy Pop will join us when we do a New Jersey hike in the fall.

— Linus

Tyringham Cobble Appalachian Trail Loop

 

Fielden Stream at the trailhead

Fielden Stream at the trailhead

Well, when life hands you lemons, make lemonade! That’s what we did last weekend. We had our first backpacking trip of the year together planned for Friday the 5th. Leading up to that day It was perfect hiking weather. Not too hot, a light breeze to keep the bugs away, sunshine…  And then, you know how it goes. You find out days before there will be some rain. Ok, no problem, we’ve hiked and camped in rain many times. Its part of the fun. But then you hear the system is a really big one, having left tornadoes and major flooding in its wake as it blasted northeastward to us. Inches of rain predicted, for a full day of relentless downpour.

Signs signs everywhere signs

Signs signs everywhere signs

Now we’ve been caught in that many times. Just the week before I was caught in a thunderstorm on Sharon Mountain in Connecticut while doing some trail work with a friend from the club.  Once you’re out there, there ain’t much you can do but soldier on through it. Or get off the trail for a day and wait out the misery if its really necessary. But when you haven’t left yet, there’s room for modifications. Why be miserable if you don’t have to be.  I honestly don’t mind a lot of rain if its the middle of summer. But when temperatures are in the 40’s and 50’s, that’s when hypothermia can really be a risk.

We were planning to do the first section of New Jersey southbound.  I have a friend that lives near Vernon and was going to shuttle us and we picked the direction so that we were going to go down the infamous “Stairway to Heaven” on Wawayanda mountain. While that didn’t sound really fun to go up in the pouring rain, coming down was probably even more dangerous.  Time for a new plan. Even many of the thrus we were following on YouTube were opting for a zero mile day In town or at camp.

Bunny rock, Tyringham loop trail

Bunny rock, Tyringham loop trail

We re-focused our attention on Massachusetts where we left off there last year, and I looked into some nice day hike options in the area where we could do some of the A.T. and get some views but also could do some other relaxing things like stay in a favorite inn and luxuriate a little. We love the Red Lion in Stockbridge, so we got a great off-season rate room there and spent the drive up stopping into shops and taking our time. We arrived at the Inn for a great lunch in their tavern. The Inn goes back hundreds of years and was a carriage stop where the likes of George Washington stayed. I’m assuming this was on the route from Boston to Albany, now the nearby Massachusetts turnpike. This town also is the location of the Alice’s Restaurant song, and where Norman Rockwell began a long illustrious career.

Views from the Western shoulder

Views from the Western shoulder

I picked the loop of the Cobble and Appalachian trails in nearby Tyringham. While not a very high peak, Tyringham Cobble’s rocky top (where the word Cobble comes from in mountain lingo) provides a wide scenic view of the valley below, once farmed by the Shakers when Tyringham was called Jerusalem. Its about a 2.1 mile loop over the cobble in this state reservation and really not challenging at all. But it was perfect for the occasion and we had planned to hike it that day still should the rain let up a bit. It didn’t do that until dark. So as the rain kept pouring down, we headed to the Norman Rockwell museum to see his artwork as well as an exhibit on the cartoons of our childhood by Hannah-Barbera. It was a treat, and the Rockwell pieces were moving as well. They had brought his final studio from its former location onto this location a few miles away, and overlooking another scenic vista. Everything in the studio had been left exactly as he did.

I'm a ham

I’m a ham

We headed back to our Inn for some lazy time and then visited a local sushi restaurant and then saw some local talent in the pub in the basement.

The rain stopped around dinner time and I lamented a bit that we could have hit the trail late and hiked in to camp. But we were having a nice time. And even though the rain stopped, everything would be soaked when we went to set up camp in puddles. And, the hike out would be about 9 miles if we wanted to finish the section still, and we would not have had time for as we had to head home by 2.  Still, my heart is on the trail so In the future, I am just going to have the gear in the trunk in case things change on a dime again.  We’ve shot ourselves in the foot before doing the same thing only to have the rain stop well before predicted.

Hemlock grove

Hemlock grove

We had a nice breakfast at the local cafe after checking out and headed for the park. Some new storm clouds were moving through and the skies over Beartown forest were dark for a bit. But as we arrived, the clouds began to move. We hiked up the loop trail as the sun began to show. On this side of the loop there is a great view of the valley from a rock affectionately known as ‘bunny rock’. It is a a glacial erratic between the trail and the farmland beyond. Everywhere along this trail were special gates that livestock could not open. It began to then climb through Hemlock stands until reaching the grassy spine of the mountain’s eastern shoulder. We ran into three different thru hikers coming down the hill on the A.T. almost immediately. They did look a little damp and grumpy so to made me feel a bit better about not doing the overnight! The third one I stopped to ask if he knew one of the thru hikers I was watching, who had gone through the area just a day before and who I was sad we would be missing running into today. He didn’t know him but we had a nice brief exchange of words before heading to the summit.

I love this sloping hill

I love this sloping hill

We passed a family with their kids and dogs who went the other way around the loop and made it to the summit just in time for our own private visit there. We had a snack, took in the gorgeous views, and then followed the trail down into another hemlock stand on the west side of the mountain. When it was time to branch off the A.T. back on to the loop Traill my heart and legs tugged at me a bit, wanting to keep following the white blazes. But I knew we’d regroup shortly and I was already planning another first backpacking trip together for June.

If interested, the Exhibit runs through 5/29

If interested, the Exhibit runs through 5/29

I am going to be up here again in early June in a more official capacity so Fielden Stream is going to come with, and after the necessary meetings are done I am going to have a friend in the club help us drop our car and shuttle us back to Tyringham so we can cover the Beartown state forest section we had just skipped for this short day hike excursion.  I am hoping it won’t rain cats and dogs again for 12 hours straight, but this time we should have warmer temps, longer days, and a bit more resolve. I’d like to try and finish Massachusetts this season but with all my official trail commitments we may not until next summer.  That’s ok, with another 2,000 miles to go, what’s the hurry?

This hike is great for families with little kids or big kids alike. Its not difficult, its very scenic, and its close to many picturesque New England towns and other great hikes like nearby Monument Mountain and Laura’s tower.

Miles: 2.1

— Linus

Easter Trail Work on the Appalachian Trail

Streams are flowing!

Streams are flowing!

On Easter I was very happy to have an opportunity to again be out on the trail doing my thing. Usually we’re celebrating the holiday in some capacity with family but it fell right during my kids’ spring break this year so we were in Florida and returned late the night before. Since my parents went out of town for the family visit and weren’t around Easter morning, Fielden Stream and I did a quick exchange of baskets with the kids and then I headed up north for the woods.

Looking Southeast from Schaghticoke Mtn

Looking Southeast from Schaghticoke Mtn

It was a very mild weekend and had I returned one night earlier I would have done an overnight. Quite a few hikers had, especially those who had Good Friday off as it made a great 3 day weekend. My friend on the trail crew let me know that there were already several camping at Ten Mile so I planned to visit the campground as part of my hike in case there was any cleanup to do. Just two weeks before when we were out on a volunteer work day, we had to clear two very large fire rings (and a few blowdowns) and I was glad to have the extra manpower. This is one of the most popular camping areas around so we visit and patrol it and have to clean it up very often.  I wanted to also visit the southern overlook on Schaghticoke Mountain, so the plan was to go up there and then back down to the campsite and in the meantime check out some of the side access trails along the route for any issues.

New water system

New water system

I parked and started the .4 mile road walk where the A.T follows Schaghticoke road north before cutting into the woods for the nearly 1,000ft ascent. While there are several switchbacks,  its still a tough climb, but worth the view at the top. I noticed the map box was empty so I made a note to myself to put any spares I had in the box on the way down if no hikers I met on the trail needed one.  As I started up the trail a young hiker in his late 20s passed me and we chatted for a bit about his hike and the work I do. He was doing a 3 day section of CT, having done another a few weeks ago with his brother in the northern end of the state.  He works the night shift and was up all night before starting his hike.

Cleaning fire rings on the mountaintop

Cleaning fire rings on the mountaintop

The trail heals all though, and I admire his tenacity to hike 12 miles in the heat after working all night. Ah to be in my 20’s again… I’d probably have climbed a few 4000s had I the passion I have now for hiking and backpacking. At that age I was deeply entrenched in the NYC music scene trying to make a name for myself. It was fun but in vain.  I still play music with my friends but I find more relaxation and purpose hiking and preserving the trail.

Anyway just a bit farther on at the first stream crossing (which was raging by the way) , I met an older hiker who was doing a NOBO thru. He was hydrating and enjoying some shade. While it was raining that morning the sun came out and the temperature quickly approached the 70s. Without much leaf cover to shade, you could feel every bit of the heat that day. I wished him well and moved on.

Schaghticoke from the road below

Schaghticoke from the road below

I met the younger hiker again, enjoying a snack high on a glacial erratic – a great spot if I say so myself! We said hellos again and I carried on up and up and up. When I reached the south overlook I was immediately treated to a Bald Eagle AND a Red Tailed Hawk flying over the edge of the ridge. I had been trying for months to spot one of the eagles as many hikers had reported seeing them in the area. Finally one greeted me in its glorious flight.  I was so captivated by the view and the birds of prey that it took me a few minutes to notice the fire area on the rock face. There was no ring at that point, perhaps they scattered it with the ashes after. I checked that it was cool and went about cleaning it.  Much of the residue was tossed down into a depression in the hillside and as I headed down to clean that up the young hiker reached the viewpoint. He thanked me for my work and as we were chatting we spotted a large black racer snake about a foot from where I was working. He did not bother me and just watched, perhaps a good omen or spirit animal visiting me to thank me for taking care of what was once native land? I’m such a history nerd.

Forsythia gone wild!

Forsythia gone wild!

The hiker moved on after this break and I too headed off, back down the mountain towards Ten Mile. I passed the older Nobo thru hiker I had met at the stream below and gave him some advice on nearest water and campsites ahead as he was wanting more water and a break from the heat.

Speaking of water, I also made a short video on the mountaintop discussing my new water system. I am again revisiting because I still want an easier solution than filling up my reservoir in my pack and using that as the water for camp and sleeping as well. I tried the new Katadyn BeFree with .6L bag and a Smart Water bottle with an Aquaclip, one of many solutions I researched to hang the water bottle in front of me since my pack pouch doesn’t have stitched in side pockets.

With my aquaclip and SmartWater bottle

With my aquaclip and SmartWater bottle

While my day pack does, it still requires practically dislocating your shoulder to reach back for access. With the BeFree I can just fill up at a source, camel up, then refill quick and easily to filter into my smart water bottle, and a Nalgene if I need extra. This thing filters super fast and doesn’t require backflushing as far as I can tell. I always bring emergency purifying tablets just in case, for myself or hikers I encounter who have no filter or water left.

I tend to carry too much water at any one time and this system and solution that was in the product reviews seemed a good one to try next. The water sources have all been great lately with all the epic rainfalls and snowmelt since winter died and so for the time being at least I wont carry more than the beFree and the 1L Smart Water bottle (with sports cap). Though I do still hate how those bottles crinkle. I may go the shock cord and Gatorade bottle next if the Smart Water bottles start to bother me that much. I will post the video on the blog  (Please note that I was rushing on the video and said I’d chug it right after filling it at the stream but I meant only AFTER the filter cap was back on.. very important!

Name that spider

Name that spider

I dropped off the maps in the map box on the way down, and some litter that I picked up on the trail when I passed my car and headed back into the woods towards Ten Mile Shelter and Campsites. There are some beautiful new signs in this area both for the side trails and the shelter – great work team! The Forsythia is also blooming like mad. When I reached the campsite no one was still camped there and luckily for me this time, no fires to clean up. Though there was a massive spider in the shelter that I noticed when I went to sign the register. I just saw his long legs peeking out behind a piece of the lumber frame, but could easily tell he was 1.5 inches or more around and brown and black. I’m not the hugest fan of spiders but all the time on the trail has helped that a bit. Many a day I found one of these in a privy or even on my pack in the morning. They’re pretty terrifying to look at but also fascinating and I’m quite sure not harmful. I believe this was either a wolf spider or a fisher spider. Anyone wanna have a go at identifying it from the photo?

An unspoiled view from the top

An unspoiled view from the top

I made my way back along the A.T. as it followed the Housatonic River, which was also at very high levels complete with raging rapids. I passed about 25 day hikers out here in the recreational area at Bulls Bridge which the A.T. passes by. I checked that side trail and left my friends on the Bull’s Bridge task force a message in their kiosk register, then headed back to my car.  As the season is starting up around here, and water is good, I should have a busy summer. On that note I am also very excited as I have some new roles in the AMC that allow me to further my love for the trail and protecting it and our natural resources. More to come on that but you will see me out there over the weekends this season often anywhere between the NY line and southern Massachusetts! Maybe I’ll even be on duty at your campsite for the night and you can share stories of your hike.

Miles: 6.3

Snakes: 1

Birds of Prey:2

— Linus

 

First Hike of 2017: Video Blog: Herrick Trail/A.T. Out-and-Back

View from Amy's Overlook

View from Amy’s Overlook

A week ago I finally got out for my first hike of the year. It was a very cold day, and we had just had some recent snow, though not much. It was enough that on the ledges at the overlooks I needed my microspikes so as not to slip off! For the first time I explored the Herrick Trail, a short trail that connects with the A.T. along Ten Mile Hill. On my many journeys along the A.T. in this area I had always seen the trail sign, and one mentioning an overlook a mile away. But never did I take that path or realize just how great BOTH overlooks were, including the one they didn’t bother to mention just a quarter mile or less down the hill overlooking the Housatonic River! Wow! This is definitely my next family hike. I did a whole video blog which you can view here. Apologies for all the sniffling I’ve been getting over a bad cold or upper respiratory thing.  I’ll be back out on the A.T. for a longer stretch soon for my first patrol of the year.  We have a couple of unusually warm January days I want to take advantage of.

Family Holiday Hike to Pine Mountain

My nephew at the trailhead

My nephew at the trailhead

In 2016 we finally bought a house. While a stressful process, of course its been worth it and we love our home. It also meant that we were expected to host for the holidays. So for Christmas 2016, we had the whole family here including my younger brother and his boys who stayed with us at the house. We had a great visit and spent a lot of time together in the same space.

My brother and I

My brother and I

So when I suggested we do a family hike the day after Christmas to get some exercise and fresh air, my younger brother and his boys were as excited as I was to get out of the house for a while and have an adventure. They live in Colorado near Boulder/Denver, so mountains are not something they are missing. And I can’t wait to hike with them when we visit them in Colorado. But today I was taking them out in my neck of the woods!

While I wanted to take them to my favorite trail again (you know, the Appalachian Trail), time was limited and so I took them to the nicest lookout and section of trail I knew about in the area; and its about half as far a drive. Incidentally it’s where I did a hike around the same time the previous year! I guess this is my holiday hiking spot. A place to go and perch myself on the edifice and reflect on the year coming to a close.

My brother and his boys on Pine Mtn

My brother and his boys on Pine Mtn

Pine Mountain and its fantastic lookout are now part of the relatively new Ives Trail, named after a famous composer from Danbury who loved the outdoors and built a lean-to near this lookout so he could enjoy the view whenever he wanted and share it with his friends.

I’ve done the entire 20 miles of the Ives Trail from West Redding to Ridgefield, but this view and part of the trail is my favorite so I come back often.

Linus on Pine Mtn

Linus on Pine Mtn

The view is amazing and on a clear day you can see all the way to Long Island Sound. But on most days you can see the Ridgefield lakes below, and Seth Low Pierrepont mountain and state park in the near distance (you can see it in the distance behind me in the picture here). The rocky precipice at the Pine Mountain lookout reminds me a lot of my favorite ones on the Appalachian Trail, with a view nearly as good, especially considering you’re still in the posh suburbs of Fairfield County, Connecticut.

Old fireplace

Old fireplace

The hike was perfect for the amount of time we had and also good for smaller hikers. The distance from the Pine Mountain trailhead is only about half mile up to the lookout and with some fun little scrambles and great ridge walking views along the way. To reach the true summit is about another quarter mile so all said and done it was only about 1.5 miles round trip, though rewardingly scenic and fun. After taking in the view at the lookout we headed up to the fireplace (Ives’ picnic fireplace I believe) and then the true summit where a small cairn demarcates the otherwise wooded peak. On the way back down we stopped again at the overlook for one more view, before hiking back down to the car for a family lunch to follow. There was a small amount of iced over snow on the lower part of the trail near the road, but the rest was clear of any real hazards.

Me and my nephews at the summit

Me and my nephews at the summit

Pine Mountain reserve is its own open space but is tied together to the other trail systems of Hemlock Hills and Bennett’s Pond as well as by the Ives Trail. At around 1,000ft Pine Mountain is also in fact the highest point in Ridgefield. At this time of year we were also able to see the view to the northwest from a western shoulder of the mountain along the trail on the way up, because all the leaves were off the trees. Though it’s not a great view in that direction.

I look forward to my first hike of 2017, in a few days I hope… life has been making me wait a little longer lately.

Miles: 1.5

— Linus