Appalachian Trail Connecticut: Bulls Bridge to Ten Mile Hill Loop

Last weekend I finally got back out on the A.T., and brought along a good friend of mine, Crista. She and I are in a band together, and we’ve been talking about doing a hike for about a year and we just never were able to coordinate it until now. Several of my friends in our AMC chapter were trying to get together with me to hike over the weekend but it worked out that they all had to go Saturday. When Crista reached out that she was free and looking to hike on Sunday, it was a done deal! We have both had a pretty tumultuous year with family and personal matters. So as usual, the trail provided the necessary therapy.

It was a great hike, and I counted almost 50 others enjoying the trail in the 3 hours we were out there. There had been some light snow in the morning but it stopped before we arrived and the temperatures warmed up to around 40. The spikes stayed in the car. We enjoyed a snack on top of Ten Mile Hill, and a break at the shelter. The Ten Mile and Housatonic Rivers were raging from the winter run off, and we saw some kayakers braving the rapids where the trail follows the river. They knew what they were doing!  We look forward to hiking again this season, and maybe her and her kids joining me on an overnight.

I am gearing up for another big year. I managed 239 miles in 2018, my annual personal best to date. This season Fielden Stream and I plan to finish the last 18 miles of New Jersey, and then start Vermont or Pennsylvania. I have also been signed up again as a weekend ridge runner for the season. And last but not least, I am also dreaming up some big solo hike plans, if I can work out the time off in this new year. Photos from the hike below.

Miles: 5

  • Linus
Bandmates on the Anderson Bridge

Bandmates on the Anderson Bridge

Frosty blazes

Frosty blazes

Ten Mile Hill

Ten Mile Hill

On Top of Ten Mile Hill

On Top of Ten Mile Hill

Frosty Lichens

Frosty Lichens

The Raging Housatonic

The Raging Housatonic

Ridgerunner Weekend #5, Ten Mile River Area, South Kent, CT

Housatonic Overlook on Herrick Trail

Housatonic Overlook on Herrick Trail

My last summer seasonal ridge runner weekend was over the October 14th weekend. It ended up that I just went out on the Sunday for the day.  I met up with my buddy Ray from our Connecticut AMC chapter. We walked down to the Ten Mile River shelter and campsites from the Bulls Bridge trailhead and found plenty of issues. Both bear boxes were left open, one filled with bags of food trash.

Clearing illegal fire ring

Clearing illegal fire ring

At the shelter was left a whole onion, and a cast iron pot which was clearly used to cook in the night before. All of these things are an open invitation to wildlife, even in daylight. This then becomes a danger for humans, and a danger for the wildlife.

It is known that a boy scout troop was there the night before. I’d just like to reiterate that as scouts you and especially your leaders are responsible for following and teaching leave no trace. Had I had the chance to encounter them I would have gone through this in person but please, we all must follow these rules.  I also found 2 fire pits behind the shelter, with beer cans and tinfoil.

Moss and Nightcrawlers

Moss and Nightcrawlers

Ray packed out the trash and iron pot while I continued my walk up to Ten Mile Summit and the Housatonic Overlook. And I cleaned up the firepits on the way back and checked the privies for issues.

The more people break the rules and risk the delicate agreement between private landowners along the trail perimeter, the more the very trail is put at risk. Please follow the rules. As a former scout, it breaks my heart to think there might be leaders out there willingly breaking leave no trace rules but also teaching scouts that this is acceptable behavior. It’s not.

Me and Ray, CT AMC pals

Me and Ray, CT AMC pals

Enjoy nature. Take only pictures, leave only footprints.

Lecture over. Happy trails

Miles: 5

Ridgerunner Weekend #2: Schaghticoke and Ten Mile Hill

For my second ridgerunner hike of the season, I decided to cover the trail between Schaghticoke campsite and the New York border at Hoyt Road. Weather predicted was dicey at best, but the heavy rain held off until hours after I was off trail Sunday (well except for one 5-minute drizzle Saturday).  Temperatures stayed cool in the 60s Saturday and through the night, and a light breeze kept it mostly bug-free. There were several familes out backpacking with their kids which is always great to see, many friendly trail dogs, and the usual day, section, and thru hikers we would pass on the trail.

I hiked and camped again with my friend Brian from the AMC Saturday, and then Sunday another friend and member of our AMC crew, Lisa, joined us for part of the morning’s hike.  We camped by the river at Ten Mile campground Saturday night and there met many great through hikers, one of which serenaded us at night with his backpacker guitar and was aptly named “tunes.”  It was a perfect overnight with the sound of the river lulling us all off to bed.  We also visited our gang at the Bull’s bridge and were treated to a little trail magic by them as we came to the end of our trip Sunday.

We saw deer up close and personal, red efts, and Brian spotted our local Blue Huron Jim at the river early in the morning. I guess I missed Jim by about 5 minutes this time…

I did another round of freezer-bag cooking with Knorr rice sides, and added a Lipton onion soup mix to soak up any remaining water and give more sodium… though it tasted and worked great my stomach wasn’t thrilled… so maybe won’t do that again. I also did a pepperoni and mustard wrap Saturday afternoon which was a perfect lunch to power me through the tough Scaghticoke section a second time. I am enjoying trying new meal options to avoid monotonous trail cuisine.

The only preaching I’ll do here today is please don’t leave trash in the bear box. We packed out a stinky bag of food from Schaghticoke campsite and it leaked all over Brian’s tent and pack cover which he was fortunate enough to have a rushing river to wash it off in and sun to then dry it out. The bear box is not a trash bin and in some areas they’ve all been locked up due to this abuse.

I pushed myself mileage-wise so I could get in good shape for the Shenandoah trip next week as I hope to get some big miles in – weather, and body-permitting… My knee was a little grouchy with me on this one but mostly because it was difficult terrain Saturday and I was moving fast… Shenandoah’s segments for the most part are much gentler, especially on the knees or so I’ve heard. Let’s hope that’s true. Either way it’s one of my favorite places to be and to hike so there’s no such thing as a bad time for me there.

Miles day 1: 10.2

Miles day 2: 7.8

– Linus

Hikin buddies

Hikin buddies’

Many state line crossings on this one

Many state line crossings on this one

View from Indian rocks

View from Indian rocks

Brian at Indian rocks

Brian at Indian rocks

Finally, mountain laurel!

Finally, mountain laurel!

Not a trash can

Not a trash can

Lunch perfection

Lunch perfection

My deer friend..

My deer friend

Cuisine fun

Cuisine fun

 

 

Ridgerunner Weekend #6

Well it turns out they needed me for one more weekend and I was more than happy to go, with the great October weather. Well, I’m ALWAYS happy to go. The weather was in the 60s-70s all weekend, even if a little overcast. Lows were predicted in the mid-50s which is balmy for October, and I was thrilled to have my friend Brian along for the overnight to share hiking and camping stories until hiker midnight. The scouts were out in force, and we also had our annual CT AMC chapter Appalachian Trail day and picnic, so I got to spend a few hours with all of my favorite trail people, and make some new friends. Miles were low but morale and hiker numbers were high so I spent a lot of time interacting with hikers, scout troops and our great volunteers out doing their work parties on waterbars, invasive removal, and general cleanup. The foliage was really turning, so while I had to be a little more careful on the leaf-covered trail, the scenery was gorgeous.

I hope to get out one more time in November for an overnight with friends if the weather holds up.  The plan is the Mohawk trail. I just have to remember to fill out their backcountry camping permits!

Photos below.

Miles day 1: 6.6

Miles day 2: 5.1

  • Linus
    Frog hunting flies on Schaghticoke mtn

    Frog hunting flies on Schaghticoke mtn

    Autumn Sassafrass

    Autumn Sassafrass

    Linus and Brian on Scaghticoke Mtn

    Linus and Brian on Scaghticoke Mtn

    New blowdown art

    New blowdown art

    A fine cup of morning Joe

    A fine cup of morning Joe

    Home for the night

    Home for the night

    Selfie with the new hiker sculpture in Kent, CT

    Selfie with the new hiker sculpture in Kent, CT

    Ned Anderson Bridge, Ten Mile and Housatonic Rivers confluence

    Ned Anderson Bridge, Ten Mile and Housatonic Rivers confluence

    Nice new waterbar

    Nice new waterbar

    Wingdale, NY from Ten Mile Hill

    Wingdale, NY from Ten Mile Hill

    Ned Anderson Bridge and the Housatonic River

    Ned Anderson Bridge and the Housatonic River

    Foliage on display

    Foliage on display

First Hike of 2017: Video Blog: Herrick Trail/A.T. Out-and-Back

View from Amy's Overlook

View from Amy’s Overlook

A week ago I finally got out for my first hike of the year. It was a very cold day, and we had just had some recent snow, though not much. It was enough that on the ledges at the overlooks I needed my microspikes so as not to slip off! For the first time I explored the Herrick Trail, a short trail that connects with the A.T. along Ten Mile Hill. On my many journeys along the A.T. in this area I had always seen the trail sign, and one mentioning an overlook a mile away. But never did I take that path or realize just how great BOTH overlooks were, including the one they didn’t bother to mention just a quarter mile or less down the hill overlooking the Housatonic River! Wow! This is definitely my next family hike. I did a whole video blog which you can view here. Apologies for all the sniffling I’ve been getting over a bad cold or upper respiratory thing.  I’ll be back out on the A.T. for a longer stretch soon for my first patrol of the year.  We have a couple of unusually warm January days I want to take advantage of.

A Day In The Life of a Trail Patroller: Ten Mile Video Journal

Video Journal

Video Journal

I realized I was so chatty in this video that you probably will learn all about this hike by watching the video! The new setup with the phone worked better than the GoPro but I do need to remember to keep the same horizontal orientation throughout so please pardon the switches to the vertical shots. I’ve almost got this video thing down! I know I’ve covered this section before but it was not a great quality video… This hike was a windy and wonderful Veterans Day, and I got to cut my first blowdown! Thanks veterans for your service.

Click here to watch the video

Miles: 4.1

— Linus

Appalachian Trail — CT Section 5

Doorway to Connecticut

Doorway to Connecticut

I did my first solo hike as an AMC volunteer trail patroller for the Connecticut chapter on Saturday.

In our state the AMC and its volunteers manage the entire section of trail, about 52 miles. We also have caretakers, boundary monitors, sawyers, maintainers and other important roles to help preserve and enhance the trail.

For those that are not familiar with the patroller role it is basically the same as a ridge runner but not on a seasonal, paid basis. In my particular role the advantage is I can hike or backpack whichever sections I choose when I am able vs. being assigned to one area at a certain time. Though occasionally at a very busy time, we will be called up to help support the ridge runners in certain high traffic areas. At the end of the day we all have the same goal. Both are great because many volunteers with different schedules and desires all contribute how they can.

Ten Mile Shelter

Ten Mile Shelter

We greet hikers, help provide them with information they might be seeking like maps, distances to shelters, campsites or road crossings, educate about leave no trace ethics, clear stealth campsites that in our state are likely on private property if they’re off trail, and fire rings which are illegal here. While we don’t have any authority to fine anyone, big issues will be conveyed to the proper people to protect others’ responsible future enjoyment of the trail. I was inspired to take the position by those I met backpacking this summer. The ridge runners and caretakers were extremely passionate about what they did, and the trail. If you see these folks out there, give them some props! They do a lot to make your experience what it is, and likely cover as much mileage while traversing their turf.

Once upon a time as a newbie hiker and backpacker maybe I too thought all this was overkill. But having seen the results of large amounts of trash left behind, the aftermath of errant fires at popular campsites and still-hot embers left in many a fire ring, I concur that sadly stricter rules have to be enforced if you want to have a trail at all. A good percentage of hikers are newbies, and while they are out for an exciting and challenging adventure that has many admirable qualities, some seem to care little about what they leave behind, because they are just passing through or are too young to think about the effects their actions have.

Ned Anderson bridge

Ned Anderson bridge

While there’s as large a contingent of considerate hikers who follow leave no trace ethics and truly care for the environment they are traveling in, there are always those who will not. I witnessed this on this very hike when I saw some trail magic left from one hiker to another as I headed out for my hike. I smiled when I saw this thoughtful gesture. But when I came back on my return several hours later, I noticed the second hiker had picked up their trail magic and then left the unneeded note and bag it was left in in the trail map box rather than pack it out. A ziploc bag and a piece of paper weight about an ounce or less. There was a town a few miles up the trail that is a popular resupply spot where it could have been disposed of. Surely that extra ounce wasn’t going to weigh them down.

Housatonic Rapids

Housatonic Rapids

There’s also a spot in New York that was famous for letting hikers stay overnight on their lawn and that we enjoyed visiting on a summer backpacking trip this year. But because of a very badly behaved hiker later that summer, they’ve stopped doing so after many many years. People have to realize that their actions directly affect the experience and enjoyment of many others at some point. The few CAN ruin it for the many. And while I admire those who can hike 2,000+ miles in a few months and hope to do myself one day, your accomplishment doesn’t excuse littering or bad behavior.

While I have already done all of the trail in Connecticut and will be doing it over and over and over as part of my volunteering, I am excited to get to know our section of trail even more intimately and in more depth while also protecting it. And so I explored this section of trail in much more detail, which was fun. I ended up skipping the first .2 miles from Hoyt road to the route 55 parking lot due to time constraints and honestly there really is no area there that one would want to stealth camp. Its a lovely but boggy little area that I enjoyed walking through though when I did it the first time.

At Ten Mile Hill summit

At Ten Mile Hill summit

It was a beautiful day for a hike and I also enjoyed seeing more of the views than last time because there were no leaves on the trees. I enjoyed crossing the Ned Anderson memorial bridge again (seen above), named after a local resident who was responsible for blazing and maintaining the original section of trail in Connecticut. I am currently reading a book about him that I bought at the ATC headquarters in Harper’s Ferry, West Virginia.

The rivers were as scenic as ever and the view from Ten Mile Hill even more impressive without the leaf cover. While only 1,000 feet high, the trail on either side of the summit drops 700 or more feet with a fairly steep grade – a formidable introduction to our ‘flat’ state. It always amuses me how many have the impression the trail in Connecticut is a joyride. While it is lower in elevation than many other states, and has a flat section or two, there’s a LOT of good climbs and descents to challenge any seasoned hiker.

I met another maintainer and a friend of his on my way nobo (northbound) and caught up with them on the way back and we all hiked out together, exchanging stories and making plans for more hikes when possible. Its great to see all the enthusiasm our volunteers have, and the respect we have for each other. It’s a great organization, and I hope my story today helps inspire others to take care of the trail they love, and maybe even volunteer.

Happy trails! I hope to see you out there.

— Linus