Appalachian Trail: Pennsylvania Section 10

Over the last weekend of June, we were geared up to do a 2-night/3-day backpacking trip to kick off Vermont. However, a swollen knee for Fielden almost took hiking off the schedule completely. She was limping and using a walking stick for days because of this inflammation and I was sure it was a done deal. To be honest, MY knee had also flared up on the last long downhill on last month’s hike. I have since been doing my daily planks a lot which really helps.

Luckily, over the next few days her knee did come back online, and with only minimal swelling and pain. We were feeling better about getting out there for our much needed forest therapy. But I still didn’t feel like it was wise to do the Vermont section in these circumstances. There are several large ups and downs, and it was a 17-mile section, and we had 2 nights planned. I felt it would be too risky to do this section and then have an injury come back miles in (and up), and have to be rescued out. The trail isn’t going anywhere, and we will be back for that section.

Instead, we picked a totally flat section in Pennsylvania’s Cumberland Valley, and decided to cover the 12 miles in two day hikes and a hotel overnight.  This worked out great, especially since it was in the 90’s both days, and despite my new OR sunhat and shirt helping me keep the sun’s effects at bay, we were happy to be back in the hotel pool after each day’s mileage.

Our planned start point got screwed up because I used an old version of AWOL’s guide and the hotel we planned to stay at so we could walk back to it from the trail, had been demolished and moved 1.5 miles down the road on the other side of the highway overpass. (That guide has since been discarded in favor of my 2019 White Blaze guide… lesson learned! ) Yes we could have walked the extra miles, but 2 miles on a busy road in 95 degrees was not of interest.. So we adapted, and decided to start in the middle and hike to the southern end on day 1, and then on day 2 pick a starting point farther north of originally planned, and hike back to the middle point. With the help of UBER, which was very active here, we got both sections done without a hitch other than me slipping on a muddy spot and wiping out! No matter, I had real hiker cred when we rolled into Boiling Springs and I had dried mud all over me! I’m sure they thought I was a thru at the ATC Mid-Atlantic regional HQ and the outfitter.

A great little town, we loved the walk along the Children’s lake and seeing the old furnace, as well as the chatty geese and ducks who surely know it’s THEIR lake. We ate at an old tavern in town and got recommendations for some other places to check out. Though by the time we were done eating, we were eager to get back to the pool to cool off. The tavern were very hiker friendly, you just have to leave your packs outside.

We also enjoyed roaming and dining in Carlisle’s historic downtown, including a cool vintage shop, a great hard-cider brewery for a tasting and seeing where George Washington visited.

This section’s walk through fields and pastures over many stiles was bucolic, save for the three highway overpasses. It was nice when we got a little shade in the forested sections.  We saw many thru and section hikers, though most of the earlier-start thrus are past here now. We saw some bear scat and tracks on the second day, but no bears. With all the berries out in bloom, its not surprising the bears are active.  We enjoyed visiting the ATC’s Scott Farm trail crew work center which the trail passes right by. It’s said this facility may be closing and there’s currently an effort to keep it active. I hope they do, as the section of trail a few miles in either direction from it was very well maintained and had lots of beautiful boardwalks. So their efforts are palpable and appreciated for hikers. We were short about 1 mille of this complete section but I decided on this on purpose as there is overnight parking at Sherwood Road and not at 944, so this was necessary for doing the next sections north as overnights.

Now that we’ve started Pennsylvania (our state #6!), we may just focus on this state for a while, as the difference in drive time compared to Vermont will dwindle the more we complete headed back towards home. We may work on completing the southernmost bit to the Maryland border, as its only about 60 miles from Boiling Springs to Pen Mar. Then we can head from Carlisle back to DWG next year.  I’m excited for Pennsylvania, except for that climb out of Lehigh Gap. But I’m sure we can do it when the time comes. Just DON’T. LOOK. DOWN! Pennsylvania is one of the longest sections at around 225 miles, so it will take us a while unless we hit the lottery and can take several weeks off to finish it all. I am also considering still doing that Vermont section next and trying to complete the 14-state challenge (do a section in each of the states the trail traverses) and doing sections in the 6 remaining we haven’t hiked in at all yet… but I am such a completist that knowing me, we will continue to check off one state at a time. While we have done 4 miles in North Carolina, they were just day hikes when in the area that didn’t complete a whole section and will need to be re-done to connect the dots. It’s fine for the 14-state challenge though. I don’t know, the jury’s still out.

Anyway, you can watch the video I made of this hike here. Hope you enjoy it! Please subscribe to our channel if you do.

I’ll be back out this weekend ridge running in Connecticut as the bubble is definitely here. As I have some time off this week I may go out a day early and complete the northernmost 10 miles of the Mohawk trail I have yet to complete. This trail used to be the A.T. in the area, and this bit is the steepest and most difficult part of that trail. But also the most scenic, featuring Dean Ravine, and the view from Lookout Point. I almost made it to that point a few autumns ago but there was a lot of leaf cover and the trail on the north side of Barrack mountain was steep and eroded, and I ran out of time allotted because it was so slow going. We will see, but it would be nice to get that done and have an extra night on trail for a change.  Photos below.

Miles day 1: 4.7

Miles Day 2: 7.3

Total Miles: 12

Trail miles: 11.7

— Linus

Day 1 plan

Day 1 plan

Testing my hitch pose in case no Uber

Testing my hitch pose in case no Uber

Starting point

Starting point

Crossing the stiles in style

Crossing the stiles in style

Arriving at the road into Boiling Springs

Arriving at the road into Boiling Springs

Lots of berries out!

Lots of berries out!

Waiting for the ATC regional HQ to re-open from lunch break

Waiting for the ATC regional HQ to re-open from lunch break

At the regional HQ Mid Atlantic ATC office

At the regional HQ Mid Atlantic ATC office

Using this here mud remover!

Using this here mud remover!

A nice stroll along Children's Lake

A nice stroll along Children’s Lake

The old furnace in Boiling Springs

The old furnace in Boiling Springs

Day 2 plan

Day 2 plan

This section along the creek is lovely and well maintained

This section along the creek is lovely and well maintained

Boardwalkin!

Boardwalkin!

The creek, which had kayakers and canoers too

The creek, which had kayakers and canoers too

Lovely trumpet flowers

Lovely trumpet flowers

Scott Farm ATC trail work center

Scott Farm ATC trail work center

Turnstiles decked out with Thistle and Chickory

Turnstiles decked out with Thistle and Chickory

Center Point Knob in the distance beyond Boiling Springs

Center Point Knob in the distance beyond Boiling Springs

Hiker dirt

Hiker dirt

Back at the lot, all done

Back at the lot, all done

 

 

 

Appalachian Trail Ridgerunner Weekend #2 – Schaghticoke and Algo – Kent, CT

Over the Father’s Day weekend I made it back out to the trail for my second ridge runner weekend. The weather was perfect. I think at one point there was a drop of rain and a storm cloud off in the distance but it never materialized beyond that, and I also had several friends old and new in the picture. Always a fantastic way to spend trail time.

I decided to cover the wild ups and downs of South Kent, Connecticut known as Schaghticoke Mountain and Mount Algo. It’s a section that’s a rollercoaster of rocky ups and downs, but with views of the level of reward to match the terrain, and long tunnels of mountain laurel. I knew they’d be at or reaching peak at this time of year and it’s one of my favorite times to be on the trail. It’s not too hot yet, but the laurels are out in force and its so beautiful. Also at this time the bubble is starting through Connecticut. The faster ones at least. I saw over 25 thru-hikers that weekend, and spent the night at the campsite with at least 10 of them. I recommended JP Giffords in Kent for lunch what 5 times to thru hikers who asked me on the trail for a recommendation – I really need a referral commission! And our new visitor center in Kent.  And the Cornwall Country market Deli in Cornwall Bridge. I told them about the high water at Guinea Brook and to take the detour.

My friend Brian and I chatted with several thru hikers at Algo shelter. Raven, One Step, Stray Cat and the others I saw earlier on the trail that day. Brian hiked in later in the day to meet me after work. While I was happy to have seen 3 snakes, he saw the timber rattler as he came up the trail around 5pm that day. I saw a milk snake (which I thought was a copperhead at first!) and 2 large black racers. Rattlers do love Schaghticoke Mountain, but I guess they don’t love me. I just want to SEE one.

We saw my friend (and other weekend ridge runner) Jay on top of Schaghticoke as we were getting back to the start on the second day and chatted with him for a while. I was hoping for these two guys to meet!

Brian borrowed my Quarter Dome 1 tent so he could try it, and I think he liked it.  One Step also really liked my tent as she’s looking for a new lighter one and mine would be a huge weight savings for her as she’s carrying a half dome!

My knee has been acting up (especially on the steep downhills), and I think its cause I’ve been lazy with my daily planks, and my knee compression sleeves are worn out. Fielden’s knee has been iffy too the last week so we changed our plans to start Vermont this weekend with a pair of day hikes and a hotel overnight in a flat section of Pennsylvania from Boiling Springs to Carlisle. Boiling sounds about right as it will be 90, but our hotel has a pool. And at least we can still get a lot of trail miles in, and the experience, without having to worry about limping out miles from a campsite at 3,000ft!

The Vermont section will happen in a month or two when everyone’s healed up. This one is better for the current state of things. And, look at that we ARE starting Pennsylvania after all!. It would actually drive me a bit nuts skipping the whole state and doing Maryland first so maybe its good we’re finally starting Pennsylvania. I know there’s lots of nice sections, its just the real rocky bits I’m looking less forward to.

As an added bonus, Fielden Stream and I were out for the day in the Falls Village area the following week and ran into our favorite thru-hikers at the Mountanside Cafe! They were the ones I was hoping to run into on this weekend’s adventures. But I am glad for the new friends I did make on the trail and at the shelter. And looking forward actually to hiking some of Pennsylvania. Heck, half my family comes from there! Photos below.

Miles Day 1: 7

Miles Day 2: 7.3 (with campsite cleanups)

Wildilife: 1 Tanager, 3 snakes (4 if you count the one Brian saw)

Hikers: A LOT – Thrus especially

— Linus

View South from Scaghticoke

View South from Schaghticoke

Our favorite farmer's market from Indian Rocks

Our favorite farmer’s market from Indian Rocks

The first black racer I saw

The first black racer I saw

Mountain Laurel

Mountain Laurel

Mountain Laurel Tunnels

Mountain Laurel Tunnels

Kent from Scaghticoke Mountain

Kent from Scaghticoke Mountain

My campsite at Algo shelter

My campsite at Algo shelter

Algo shelter

Algo shelter

Eastern Milksnake on Schaghticoke Mountain

Eastern Milksnake on Schaghticoke Mountain

Me and Jay on Schaghticoke Mountain

Me and Jay on Schaghticoke Mountain

The last snake sighting

The last snake sightingThe last snake sighting

Fielden Stream, Linus, Underdog, Magic Mike and Tractor

Fielden Stream, Linus, Underdog, Magic Mike and Tractor

Appalachian Trail: Massachusetts Section 6 (and end of 7)

The Tyringham valley

The Tyringham valley

Just got home from another great weekend on the trail in Massachusetts. Luckily the rain came at all the right moments for us. We had specifically planned to do the section southbound so we could spend Saturday afternoon at Upper Goose Pond and cabin and wake up to the hiker pancakes and coffee. So that would not have been as much fun in the rain. We set up a shuttle with one of the local A.T. community shuttle drivers to pick us up where we left off at the Tyringham Cobble lot and drive us up to Rt 20 in Lee around 2 so we could hike into the cabin at primetime — around 4pm. We planned to hike from here back to the Cobble lot, with 2.1 miles on day 1 and about 9.3 on day 2.  We would be up early on day 2 and could crush those miles and get back to the car by 230 we figured, finishing off section 7 as well as doing all of 6.

More wild Iris

More wild Iris

As we drove up I realized we would get there more like 115 pm. I knew us and I knew that last 1.7 miles from the bottom of Baldy Mountain would be likely be just enough to be too much. So I got an idea. We would park at the main road and do the 1.7 miles from there to the Cobble lot by our 2pm pickup time and finish section 7 before we got the ride up to Lee.

The hike planned for day 1 was only 2.1 miles and only the first 1/3 of it was uphill. We found a spot at the lot and hit the trail as fast as we could.  I almost rolled an ankle on the first .1 on a root because I was rushing and not paying attention. Classic. This section went through some bogs and meadows on many planks with very high grasses on either side and lots of mud between the planks. Though thankfully it was very flat.

The A.T. logo carved in to a tree

The A.T. logo carved in to a tree

We then went into the woods a bit and started climbing the eastern shoulder of the mountain. We climbed over two stiles around a farm, complete with barbed wire. A mis-judgement or a slip here could mean a trip to the hospital. But the cows couldn’t be bothered and as we made it over the second stile we noticed a farmstand down the road. Or rather Fielden did. More on that farm stand later. We cranked up the speed to reach the cobble loop trail and raced down to make it to the lot by 2:05. A young family on the trail in front of us said another hiker they met just saw a bear and its cub on the way up the other side of the cobble.

Trail sign!

Trail sign!

We received word at the cabin that there were bear sightings at Shaker campsite just west of where the hiker saw the bears. And something about how they should have put their pizza boxes in the bear box? Hmmm….

We had a quick pleasant ride up to Rt 20, passing all the big outlet stores in Lee and the Massachusetts turnpike, arriving at the trailhead by 230. The first part of the trail was easy and went through some swampy bits over boards as well, then climbing up to two bridges that crossed the busy turnpike. Fielden did the arm honk and got a passing truck beneath to honk Always fun!

Fielden on the Mass Pike Overpass

Fielden on the Mass Pike Overpass

Then it was right up. It was fairly steep but not too challenging or long. And as we reached the top, passed two naked hikers. That’s right. But naked hiking day was 3 days before! I grinned and kept moving and the man made pleasant small talk as they passed Fielden stream to remove any akwardness. We had a good laugh and signed the register atop the ridge.

Trail Register

Trail Register

The trail followed the ridge down through laurels and we passed several more day hikers. This is also a popular day hike. As we reached the half-mile side trail to the cabin, we met the first of many thru hikers of the trip.

We headed down the side trail passing a few thru hikers who had clearly waited out the morning rain and enjoyed most of the day at the cabin and pond. They were likely heading only the 2.1 miles to catch a ride into Lee to zero and resupply.

At the cabin side trail

At the cabin side trail

We arrived at the cabin and scoped out the tenting sites before introducing ourselves to the caretaker and taking a tour of the rest of the grounds as she spoke to some day hikers at the cabin. The heavy rain was originally forecast to last until 4 or 5 and I was very happy to see it was ending before we even got to the first trailhead. And while it was in the high 70’s the humidity was low and it was very pleasant out. So while we set up our tent in our chosen site, we pondered a swim and a canoe ride. We were going to leave the rainfly off as it was a beautiful clear day now, but that just doesn’t ever seem like a good idea to me so we put it on and opened all the doors and vents.  Then we checked out the docks.

Love the A.T. logo carved into the privy

Love the A.T. logo carved into the privy

I was about to put my foot in the cold water at one dock to soothe my sore ankle when some of the other visitors on the dock pointed out the largest spider I’ve ever seen in the wild. A gigantic fishing spider. I mean 3 inches in diameter easy. While it was minding its own business, I didn’t want to get it wet by wobbling the dock and upset it. We took a quick look at the canoes and went to the other dock.

HUGE fishing spider

HUGE fishing spider

While there were one or two more spiders on this dock they were not radioactive sized so I moved to nearby rock to cool my ankle. There were lots of fish in the water and they didn’t seem to like my stinky foot in their water too much. At that point I wanted to just go back and eat some dinner as we were getting hungry. So we enjoyed our meal at the picnic table in our campsite and headed to the cabin to meet the many more thru hikers passing our tent site as they headed in to the cabin.

The canoes!

The canoes!

Overall there were about 10 that came in before nightfall. We spoke with them a bit to hear some of their stories until we got tired, and then retreated back to our campsite for bed. About an hour or so after we fell asleep, the rain started!

Fielden Stream at camp

Fielden Stream at camp

I remembered our packs and shoes were on the platform outside the tent so I quickly pulled them in and zipped up the vestibule doors. The group in the next site had not put on their fly and were scrambling to get the fly on and keep as much rain out as possible. It picked up quite a bit before finally tapering off an hour or so later. I love when I’m in the tent in the rain at night, it lulls me right to sleep.

The Cabin from the back

The Cabin from the back

The next morning we woke with the birds and the sunrise and headed to the cabin for the 7am pancake call. A few more thru hikers had come in overnight, including two dads and their teenage sons. We enjoyed sharing more hiking stories over breakfast. One thru named Monkey (he’s a tree surgeon) had bought some eggs at that farmstand in Tyringham and the caretaker also cooked those for him. It was nice having this special breakfast with all the other hikers and the caretaker was great.

Calm Upper Goose Pond

Calm Upper Goose Pond

We hit the trail around 8:20 after packing up our tent. The trail skirted the pond for about a mile, passing an old cabin chimney from an outdoors club once on the location who later donated the land to the National Park Service. Soon the trail headed back up into the woods through a series of hemlock groves, bog bridges, and beautiful brook crossings. Not to mention a few boulder piles to scramble over. We started passing the stream of thru hikers headed north from their last campsites about two hours into our 7.5 mile hike.  We took several breaks along the stretch and met other thru hikers at our stopping spots and chatted with them briefly. We also hiked with one of the guys who stayed a the cabin. He was also doing a southbound section hike, albeit his was 4 weeks not 2 days.

Pancake breakfast

Pancake breakfast

We were disappointed to find the view listed on the map atop Baldy mountain was now grown in. We had a tough but quick little climb up it from Webster road, but glad as we began our 2 mile descent down to Tyringham that we didn’t choose to come up this way. The knees groaned on the long downhill, some parts quite steep though never dangerous.

Old chimney

Old chimney

As we reached the bottom we remarked to our section hiker friend that it felt like rain might be coming and let him know about the farmstand about a mile ahead where Monkey got the eggs.

Club site plaque

Club site plaque

As we got to the car to head to lunch at an old 1700’s inn and restaurant, the clouds turned black and opened up a torrential downpour of rain lasting a good 30 minutes. I couldn’t help but feel for our new friend as he was clearly getting hammered with rain and we made it out just in time.

Some laurels were blooming

Some laurels were blooming

But at the same time, I was envious he got to continue on for weeks while I had to go home and back to day jobs, bills, and stress. Hiking in a downpour suddenly sounded great. I am sure though that I will get my fair share of that in the future!

Miles day 1: 3.8

Miles day 2: 7.5

— Linus

Appalachian Trail – NY Section 6

Birdhouses at RPH

Birdhouses at RPH

So we ended up switching the hike this weekend with Jiffy Pop and our hike over Shenandoah Mountain which we had scheduled for next weekend. His aunt was celebrating her 40th birthday so his presence was requested and we were able to fit in the next section by heading up to Fahnstock right after work Friday to drop off the second car and then over to RPH cabin for the night. We ended up at the cabin in late June after finishing section 5 and wandering a bit into section 6 to check it out. You can read that entry here. That day we enjoyed a little trail magic beer before heading home, and were looking forward to coming back here for a night soon and returning the trail magic.

Our new BA Rattlesnake SL3

Our new BA Rattlesnake SL3

As its right next to the road there were several benefits. First, we were able to walk in an 18-pack of beer to share with the thru-hikers we would surely meet that night and did. Also, as our hike all took place the next day, we were able to leave any gear we didn’t want to carry 7+ miles to the other end in the car here.

RPH cabin

RPH cabin

We got a good deal of rain friday night and a quick downpour Saturday morning before we could put away the tent. The rain waits for us, no doubt. Luckily this rain came when were over having coffee under the roof of the cabin. But this left a very wet tent.  So we were able to put the wet tent, our sleeping gear, and a few other unneeded items in the car to deal with later and lighten our load.

We did bring an emergency tarp, the tent stakes, and some paracord for an emergency shelter as well as the cook kit in case we needed a hot meal later in the day. Always be prepared! You never know when you will get lost, stuck or injured and having the ten essentials is always important. One hot drink, minimal protection from the elements, and some food could mean the difference between life and death.

Baby blueberries

Baby blueberries

Another benefit of it being right by the road is its one of the few on the trail where you can get a pizza or Chinese food delivered. We were perfectly prepared to eat our mountain house, but all the arriving thru-hikers were excited to order take out, and we wanted to also enjoy this unique experience on the trail with them. One pair of hikers had already ordered their pizza from a half mile up the trail so it was there when they arrived. Good thinking!  We all chipped in for one extra combo meal too so any other hungry thrus could have some. We did end up giving that to a later-arriving hiker and everyone appreciated the beer. The field behind the shelter had plenty of room for everyone to tent and several hikers stayed in the bunks so they didn’t have to pack up wet tents…

Shenandoah Mtn

Shenandoah Mtn

We enjoyed the usual stories with the different groups of hikers as they all started filing in for the night. Trail names I recall are Hot Wheels, Taco, Five,  and Ahab. But overall about ten of them stayed there that night with us. It was neat how they all knew who would be arriving at the shelter for the night because they’d been hiking on generally the same schedule so they knew each other or had at least seen each other many times.

Name that flower

Name that flower

I got to see a couple of the latest popular tents in action that I’d read about, and still feel good about our recent large tent purchase. One thru told us his ultralight tent was not very good in the type of weather you experience on the A.T. I can appreciate the weight benefits of a non-freestanding tent that uses trekking sticks for poles, but at the end of the day I will gladly carry the small amount of extra weight for the conveniences that come with it. This was my first night in the new tent as the girls used it on the family camping trip. And on my new sleeping pad I bought about a week ago.

9-11 Memorial, Shenandoah Mtn

9-11 Memorial, Shenandoah Mtn

I was comfy and dry! I didn’t even need my liner as it was plenty warm enough just in my new Snugpak jungle bag.  It will be a little tight even in this larger tent with Jiffy Pop next weekend but we will fit I’m sure. I’ll report back after that trip in about a week.  The materials on this tent are definitely lighter and more delicate than on the Passage 2, but that’s how they cut down weight.

The maintainer Tim was also hanging out at the cabin for a few hours with us. He is a former thru-hiker from the 80’s who has done a great job with the place and clearly enjoys talking with those currently doing their long journeys. They had just had a large annual trail work party there the previous weekend with over 100 volunteers, so we noticed a bunch of new boards on the walkways and some other landscape improvements nearby on the trail. It was nice to be able to see the before and after. Trail maintenance is often under-appreciated. It also seemed perfectly timed that we were staying there as there was an issue of Field & Stream and a Laura Lippman paperback on the desk!

Shenandoah Mtn meadow

Shenandoah Mtn meadow

The rain ended up burning off a bit later when were heading off of the summit Shenandoah mountain, so the views up there were still fairly socked in for most of our photos. It was a long sustained climb up there from RPH, as it was about a 900 ft difference in elevation over 3 miles. And there were one or two steep spots, but no real scrambles. We found a lot of blueberries and blackberries growing on a shoulder of the mountain and snacked on those that were ripe. The coming weeks should be delicious!

Canopus Lake, Fahnstock S.P

Canopus Lake, Fahnstock S.P

Then we crossed through a powerline clearing, but it was filled with numerous beautiful wildflowers from Black-eyed Susans to Queen Anne’s lace and many in between. For a powerline, it was actually quite nice. These powerlines were also seen from the summit of Shenandoah, where it wasn’t quite as lovely a feature in an otherwise rolling landscape of mountains. Coming off the summit after a nice snack, we headed through a lightly forested meadow and the sun started to poke through.  It became clear and hot by the time we got to the Canopus Lake overview in Fahnstock state park.

Cooling off at the lake

Cooling off at the lake

This view looks down at the beach and across the length of the lake and more of the park beyond. There was a hawk soaring overhead as if to show off to us, and the following route along the northern side of the lake to our car included a lot more steep climbs than expected. We were completely beat and overheated by the time we got to the car, though the last portion by the road was a spectacle of more incredible trail work by that section’s maintainers. Many stone staircases with elaborate stonework had been done here recently and it was a bright spot in the home stretch as we ached.

We then drove to the park entrance and went for a refreshing swim in the lake and had an ice cream before heading back. The tent and rainfly are currently airing out and drying — not making that mistake twice! We are really looking forward to taking Jiffy Pop on his first overnighter on the trail next weekend. I hope the weather cooperates for his sake, so we can make a fire and he can have a positive and inspiring first experience. I definitely hope he meets a few thru-hikers, who I think will feel its just as awesome to meet him out here.

Don't forget to dry it!

Don’t forget to dry it!

One thing I find interesting is I haven’t heard any owls on the trail yet at all this year. Last year the Barred Owls were hootin’ away every night. All I’ve heard so far are some owls at my condo, but not Barred Owls. Still trying to ID them by their hoot. But I’m thinking most of those sections we heard them on last year were in late July through September. So maybe its just that they’re not around yet. Is it a migratory pattern and they will be back in the next few months? Any owl experts?

— Linus

 

 

Appalachian Trail – CT Section 1 – Part 2

Mountain Laurel everywhere

Mountain Laurel everywhere

Hi all – this is Fielden Stream reporting in!  Just wanted to add my own info on our recent hike. First off – I was very worried about this hike as there was going to be a lot of steep sections and it was going to be the second 2-nighter that we had ever done.  So we truly underestimated our abilities here – mostly to be on the safe side.

This ended up meaning that we got to both of our campsites super early, which isn’t necessarily my preference, but it ended up being a nice relaxing addition to our trip.  This was especially true the second night as we had a gorgeous brook called Sages Ravine running right near the campsite with watering holes and 14 beautiful waterfalls.

But back to the first night.  Riga Shelter I guess is a very popular campsite mostly because it has a nice view.  It also has some private campsites that are surrounded by trees so you really don’t have to spend time with other hikers if you don’t want to.  The privy was pretty decent too although it did smell a bit.  The only thing that marred the beauty was the semi-burnt shelter (some idiot in January did it), but the trail maintainers are supposed to be fixing that this weekend.  It was a bit buggy though.  I also didn’t like the fact that you had to walk pretty far to get to the beginning and to the privy from almost everywhere (although Sages Ravine was even worse!)  There was also no picnic table – which isn’t a deal-breaker, but does tend to add a nice element.  And we did meet some more nice thru-hikers (AYCE, Buster and Sparkles) while we were there which always makes it a more fun trip.

The second night — after a heart-attack-causing decent down Bear Mountain — was at Sages Ravine.  This campsite does not have a shelter so you don’t have too many thru-hikers staying there.  They do have a camp steward though who lives there for a few days every week (they rotate them through) which was interesting as we got info about the area and some of the issues of maintaining trails. Everyone who can should volunteer to maintain trails as If you love nature it’s a great way of giving back!

Arriving at Sages Ravine Campsite in Mass

Arriving at Sages Ravine Campsite in Mass

My biggest problem with Sages was how far (and uphill!) every campsite and privy was from everything else.  I think we did more mileage walking back and forth from the campsite to the brook to the privy and back again than walking the actual trail!  The privy was also on the lower quality scale.  It was composting, but it had not been updated in quite a while and there was a big rock holding the door shut, which you had to move in order to get inside.  And like I said, it was at least an eighth of a mile from our campsite.

But our campsite was nice. We decided to set up at a group site because we wanted some company, and we got some!  We also got a nice view of a side ravine and a nice breeze that helped keep the bugs away.  And quite a thunderstorm when we were happily tucked away in our tent for the night. Many of the other campsites were up on a hill even higher than us and were in the middle of fields of grass.  Personally, I’m not a fan of camping near grass because of snakes and ticks.

We met some garter snakes along the trail yesterday, and when we arrived at Sages we were greeted by a friendly resident deer, and what we think was a bear shortly after setting up camp. Though no actual sighting occurred, few animals could snap an entire tree limb as dramatically and make the loud thump we heard hitting the ground seconds after. Luckily if it was a bear cub it ran the other way. Since we were just reading a humorous anecdote about bears in Bill Bryson’s “A walk in the woods” it just had to be a bear…

Pink Honeysuckle?

Pink Honeysuckle?

But the best part of Sages was the brook itself, and washing our feet in the deliciously cold water.  I could do that for hours.  All of my blisters stopped hurting for for like 5 minutes! The third day we got up super early so we could go have lunch at a restaurant later.  I couldn’t wait for hot food and a real bathroom. The hike out was on a side trail called Paradise Lane and I do have to say it was very paradisical! The Mountain Laurel, which is the CT state flower, was just reaching peak and it was stunning to walk through archways of them. There were also some very pretty swampy areas with bullfrogs talking to each other.  And then it was on to our delicious lunch at Toymakers Cafe in Falls Village.  If you go, get the sausage and biscuits.  They were outstanding!!!!

As we finally finished the state, we put up our video and you can view the link to it on our new youtube channel. We hope you enjoy it, though we are admittedly not film directors.

— Fielden Stream