A Day in the Life of a Trail Patroller: Campsite Cleanups, Sharon, CT

Climbing Sharon Mtn

Climbing Sharon Mtn

As the season ramps up, I’m finding more work to be done in terms of cleanup as well as more prep on my part to be in my best shape for the longer days and hikes ahead. I filled the gap between the last patrol hike and this one with a quick hike at a local nature preserve near home, which has some nice historical artifacts to add another layer to the appeal of the hike. I am a history buff as well. I just bought the book “Hiking through history: Civil War sites on the Appalachian Trail” and am really looking forward to reading it. That was one of my favorite parts of hiking through Harper’s Ferry, though the trail itself through there is also very beautiful.

Steep ridgelines

Steep ridgelines

On this day I was planning to cover a section just north from last time. I had suggested this and one other option to my crew leader as places I was considering to get out and do any cleanup necessary. He had responded that this area hadn’t been walked over lately so it was settled. My friend in the AMC, Chilly Cheeks, joined me again and we started the hike just a few trail miles north of our last outing to Pine Swamp Brook shelter and campsites. We were considering NOBO vs SOBO but as I was feeling under the weather from a recent cold going around my family, and she having had a late night, we opted for NOBO as the large elevation change would be a long descent at the end  rather than kicking off with a huge ascent. There were still plenty of ups. There always is.

At Sharon Mtn Campsites

At Sharon Mtn Campsites

There was a forecast for some possible rain but I didn’t really know how it was going to play out… do we ever? Oh so many times I’ve re-worked or canceled a hike due to rain only to find it tapered off and moved on through quicker than expected. More on that to come…

We left one car at the end of the hike in Falls Village, and it turns out our overseer of trails was there too preparing to do the same hike (though the full section) with his chainsaw to cut any problem blow downs. He shuttled down to where we started the section a few weeks ago at West Cornwall Road.

Our path behind us

Our path behind us

As we already cleaned up the campsite at Pine Swamp recently, we drove the second car up Mt Easter road to where the trail crosses near the summit and parked the second car there. This did save us several uphills which was nice but really the point was to be closer to the first of the two campsites as we had a limited amount of time as well.

The trail climbs pretty quickly up to the summit of Mt. Easter, and I recalled my notorious mud wasp sting here two years ago as well as the large slabs of pink marble all along the trail near the summit.

Hang Glider View, Taconics beyond

Hang Glider View, Taconics beyond

Chilly cheeks enjoyed the mud wasp tale and we arrived at the summit view which is somewhat grown in. Though when in winter, you can see the peaks of the Catskills. While I love a good view, I also understand that we can’t clearcut large areas of forest everywhere there’s a potential nice view.

Not long after the Mt. Easter summit we passed a group of 4 backpackers who were section hiking and said our greetings. There was an adult and a few teenagers or college aged kids so I’m assuming a father and kids. We then reached Sharon Mountain campsite and immediately saw some issues. There was a campsite that had a fire ring, as well as a shirt left hanging on a tree nearby. Surely we all know the rules of pack it in, pack it out. And with almost no leaf cover yet and the shirt being bright white, there was no missing this. In fact we saw it from 20 feet away as we approached the camp site. This is blatant disregard for nature and the rules of the trail.

Chilly Cheeks climbing some beautiful stairs on Sharon Mtn

Chilly Cheeks climbing some beautiful stairs on Sharon Mtn

Sadly so many hikers are either entitled or blissfully ignorant and so cleaning this up becomes someone else’s job. Fire rings also always come with foil or some other kind of trash in the ashes. Folks, you need a much hotter fire to melt metal, and even if you could it would just liquify the metal which would then melt onto the earth leaving a different but just as ugly mark on the landscape.

We cleared the ring and took the shirt and other trash and checked the other campsites. As we were walking out of the campsite and starting our next climb over the undulating ridges and peaks of Sharon Mountain, we heard it. We heard it several more times as well. Loud thunder.

Belter's Campsites

Belter’s Campsites

The darkening skies had given us some expectation things might get wet, but now it was definite. Ironically this is also the same spot Fielden Stream and I began to get soaked on what would be a 6 mile slog in the rain 2 years ago. The rain began as we ascended to the first peak. Sharon Mountain is a very large landmass, similar to nearby Scaghticoke Mountain. There are many shoulders and peaks and the mountain reaches for miles in each direction. This entire section is pretty much Sharon Mountain, though Mt Easter is another summit that is encircled by and attached to this one.

Please don't

Please don’t

You can’t really tell the difference when hiking it other than its another peak. The first peak and in fact all of them are no more than a few hundred feet elevation gain but its the downs before each up that give you the roller coaster experience. Nonetheless, we both had our new raincoats and were eager to put them to the test. It wasn’t really cold, and we only had about 3 more miles to go today, with no significant rock scrambles. So there was no real concern. We just enjoyed it, its part of the experience.

We passed a few more section backpackers (everyone seemed to be headed south today) and as we reached the beautiful “Hang Glider view,” the rain subsided and we were treated to expanding views. At first we just saw the Lime Rock race track and nearby Gallows Hill.

Not a trash can

Not a trash can

We could hear the announcements as a rare cyclist race was going on (we followed their route to the track up and down rt 7 to and from our hike) and was we watched, the clouds and fog moved out and you could now see the entire Taconic Range beyond. Lion’s Head and Bear Mtn in CT, and Race, Everett, Bushnell and Jug End in Massachusetts. You could also see Prospect mountain and we remarked how we loved being able to trace the path of the trail in front or behind you as you progress on your hike.  We took pictures and had a quick snack, wary of a returning rainstorm.

We rode over two more ridges and got a few more ups and another route of the trail behind us. We stopped at a stream so I could show off my new water filter and system and camel up. I made multiple airplane references as we began our initial and final descents in to ‘the greater Falls Village area.” The descent into Belter’s Bump was through a beautiful Hemlock forest, though the destruction by the wooly algelid beetle was rampant. We reached Belters and found not only 3 different areas where campers had made fires, but one scattered with all sorts of trash.

On Belter's Bump looking East

On Belter’s Bump looking East

Large piece of wood from hazard trees we cut were partially or fully burned and one of the fire rings barely had any protection from the bed of pine needles all over the ground around it. These are extremely flammable. I can’t tell you how upset this made me, as this was not far from being another large brush fire on our trail. We found a nail on a tree with no sign which we are pretty certain was the stoves only no fire sign that used to be there. Likely burned as firewood. There are many that have a deep disrespect for nature, and for rules. Sometimes I wish you had to have a leave no trace class before you get to hike the A.T. There are already so many beautiful parks defaced by graffiti. And today’s generation of young hikers as well as many locals just feel like they can do whatever they want because they will never be back.

Crossing at 112/7 with Barrack Mtn Beyond

Crossing at 112/7 with Barrack Mtn Beyond

Anyway we cleaned up the trash and the fire evidence and took in one last view on Belter’s Bump. This is a smaller hill with a little rocky outcrop requiring one last up to a rewarding view of the peaks of the Mohawk Trail (formerly the old route of the A.T. here) to the east. As we descended we were glad we chose the direction we did and joked about nearby Barrack Mtn on the Mohawk and what a beast it is. We plan to conquer it this summer. The rain never did come back. We picked up the second car back atop Mt. Easter and headed home.

Folks, please respect the trail. Leave no trace. Pack out what you pack in. There will always be those of us there to clean up and protect the trail but we can’t be everywhere and its your personal responsibility. Just like at home.

Miles: 4.7

— Linus

 

Rogers Ramp and Pine Swamp Brook Campsite, Appalachian Trail, Connecticut

Getting ready to go through Rogers Ramp

Getting ready to go through Rogers Ramp

Last weekend I checked out another (short) section of the trail and stopped into one of the campsites to clean up. The temperatures had dropped from 65 degrees on the previous Wednesday to 19 by Saturday. What a wild winter it has been. It did the same thing in the week since. I had considered a longer route for this hike but would find out after not too long that keeping it shorter was the best plan. Frost bite can really spoil a good time!

Going through Roger's Ramp

Going through Rogers Ramp

I brought along my friend Lisa from our chapter of the AMC (Appalachian Mountain Club), who now has a trail name, Chilly Cheeks! One of our senior members gave her the name and she loves it!  We’ll let you figure out what it means.  I enjoy solitude in the woods but I’m also a social animal so I get lonely out there sometimes and company is always welcome on the trail when I can get it.

 In Connecticut, like in several other states, the AMC is the organization that maintains the Appalachian Trail. We have people who do boundary work, trail building, trail maintenance, ridgerunners/patrollers (like me) and sawyers/carpenters to name just a few.  It takes many dedicated people to take care of this great trail from end to end. Our chapter is a great group of people, I truly feel like they are my extended family.

Southwestern view

Southwestern view

 The goal was to check out and clean up Pine Swamp Brook Shelter and Campsite. I had considered going on and doing the same at Sharon Mountain Campsite, but the frigid temperatures and the added chill from the high winds made an extra 6 miles round trip low on the priority list. That campsite is very primitive and less used when its not thru hiking season. So while I will get up there next to tidy up, the Pine Swamp Brook shelter was sure to have seen some recent camping. There’s a composting privy, a picnic table (complete with metal area to protect from stove accidents) bear box, water source and clean shelter in great condition.  

Campsite side trail

Campsite side trail

We started the climb up from West Cornwall Road, which rises quickly 500 or so feet and through a split glacial rock known as “Rogers Ramp”. It’s no Lemon Squeezer but it’s a very cool feature that’s both fun to hike and fun to look at. Another one of those that most of those long-distance hiking the A.T. don’t expect to find in a state like Connecticut.  The trail then switchbacks over the ramp to the south-facing ledges above. There are several nice views in the winter, and during the summer there is still one or two that are cut through the leaf canopy. This is the southern ridge of Sharon Mountain, a large mountain that reaches from here in Sharon all the way to Falls Village, sharing the space with its neighbor peak, Mt. Easter.

Signing the trail register

Signing the trail register

Once up on the ridge, the trail follows the edge for a bit before dropping down 1-200 feet into the woods to follow Pine Swamp Brook and the shelter side trail is reached just 1.1 miles from the road crossing. We took a bunch of photos both on the ramp and the ridgeline, as well as when we arrived at the campsite. I also made a short video of this hike on my video channel so you can see the terrain and the campsite, as well as a quick review of a sit pad my friend bought me in Iceland!

Pine Swamp Brook Shelter

Pine Swamp Brook Shelter

Chilly cheeks got to sign the shelter trail register for the first time with her new trail name. I did my usual sign in, and the previous entry from a hiker named Kingfisher a day prior contained some beautiful and inspiring poetry.  

We checked out the privy, bear box and campsites. In the group site there was one fire ring. We cleared the fire ring the best we could with the ground completely frozen, and covered it up.  We had a quick snack and I took a few clips for my video, then we headed out. We talked again about going farther to the next site but it was bitter cold still and so the decision was made to head back.

Chilly Cheeks in Rogers Ramp

Chilly Cheeks in Rogers Ramp

We had a nice walk back down to the cars and then drove down to Kent to do a quick check on the condition of River road so that our trail crew could get in there and clear the large blowdowns I reported on that last trip. We made a quick stop in town for some nourishment and I was on my way. I had planned to be back out today but the conditions were similar with the added icy conditions from recent snow.  While I enjoy winter hikes, frozen ground makes getting trail work done far more challenging, and snow makes it more difficult to see issues.

If not before, I will be back out with the club in early April for our club-wide volunteer kick-off day. We do this annually and cover the entire trail so that we can assess all issues still needing to be addressed before the official hiking season is in full swing. It will be good to see everyone again, and spend another great day taking care of the trail we love.

Miles: 2.4 (with side trail)

— Linus

 

Warm Winter Check on the Appalachian Trail Connecticut River Walk

Watch the video

Watch the video

February 8 was the first of what would be a string of unusually moderate midwinter temperatures. While this raises its own concerns, I’m not one to let a good weather day pass me by! I planned on a patrol hike of the river walk section from Kent to Sharon, CT. It’s almost entirely flat (and hence a favorite of tired thrus) until the end, and very scenic. There are three different camping areas on the flat section, as well as one at the top of Silver Hill on the northern end. So it’s a great way for me to check on a lot of campsites and do whatever cleanup necessary, and have a nice walk full of relaxation and some workout too. I discovered some wild things out there, and some not so cool things. Click here (or the image) to watch the adventure, in my latest video. I did the music with a dulcimer my father-in-law gave me.

Ironically, the next day delivered at least a foot of new snow.

Miles: 6.25

— Linus

Massachusetts Appalachian Trail Adventure (Sections 9&10)

Packs on, let's do this!

Packs on, let’s do this!

Last weekend we finally ventured into Massachusetts on the Appalachian Trail. Mind you, Sages Ravine campsite is officially in the state, despite the state line crossing sign being down the ravine half a mile. So we have dabbled in the state at least. Last year when we finished the Connecticut section we stayed at that campsite and had some adventures. Even Fielden Stream wrote about it. The sign placement is based on which state chapter manages the trail on either side vs the actual geological border. So this confuses many thru hikers. Though at the end of the day, they’re going to keep on going so it doesn’t really matter.

AMC Northwest Camp

AMC Northwest Camp

Anyway, we’ve been looking forward to heading north for a long time, and conquering the ledges of Mt Race, and the highest summit we’ve done so far on the trail, Mt Everett. But we were saving it for our friends to do with us and continued to work on the New York section in the meantime. We have 17.9 miles left of that state, and plan to finish it by the end of the season.

It took some time to get the planning with them in place, as they live in Miami. But it finally happened, and it was everything we could have wanted. While we were down there in Florida for winter break in February we nailed down the rest of the details and they bought tickets. We went through the equipment lists and luckily had most of what we needed to outfit them too, since we had extra gear from car camping and my gear upgrades over the years. They found a place to rent packs and had them delivered to our house a few days before the trip.

Bears!

Bears!

They did buy some nice new trail runners and Fielden Stream and I are thinking we will head over to REI and pick up some too. Clearly the hype around these within the hiking community has to be legitimate at this point. And their praise after the hike only strengthened the point. They said that they were extremely comfortable and gripped onto the rocks and roots in every tricky spot. For Fielden, she wants to try them mostly because the boots and wool socks continue to leave her feet covered in blisters no matter what we’ve tried… toe socks, different fabrics, duct tape. For me, I want to see if it will help with traction as much as they say and keep my ankles from nearly rolling on every unexpected root or rock I encounter at the wrong angle. We’ll keep you posted.

Linus and Ledges at Sages Ravine

Linus and Ledges at Sages Ravine

They arrived late the night before and Fielden and I were packing everything in their packs while they were on their flight. When they got to our house we walked them through all the gear and helped them pack it all in the most efficient way. We had some drinks and caught up a bit before getting to bed. We stayed up a little later than we probably should have and so we slept in a bit. But with June sunset at around 9pm and just over 6 miles to hike the first day, I wasn’t too concerned about not getting on the trail till almost noon. It’s about a 2 hour drive to the end point, then another 25 minutes up the mountain road to the beginning. I almost extended the end point another 2 miles, but am glad I didn’t.  Even though it was almost flat those last 2 miles, I knew it would be hot and we’d be tired from the challenging climb and descent that morning. Turns out that was a good call.

Linus and Fielden Stream

Linus and Fielden Stream

We parked just south of the Connecticut line at the AMC (Appalachian Mountain Club) Northwest camp. The camp has a cabin, but it is primitive in that there is no electricity or running water. There’s a privy at least. I wanted to check it out a little closer but there were people staying there. As members we can rent it, and I think that would be fun sometime. We took the old ‘northwest road’, a trail that skirts the CT-Mass state line on the north side of Bear Mountain and connects with the Appalachian Trail about a half mile down. I remember seeing the trail when we came over Bear Mountain last June and figuring it had to go up there to the cabin, or at least to a road somewhere. I told them about the crazy climb up Bear and asked if anyone wanted to do it for fun! After a laugh we headed north down into the ravine and along the brook as it widened and flowed past the campground.

Bear Rock Stream

Bear Rock Stream

We stopped in to the campground so they could use the privy and get a look around. I was hoping some of my AMC/ATC friends would be in the caretaker tent but I realized it was Friday morning so that was unlikely. I took a few pictures including the sign about bear activity in the area (there is no doubting this in my mind after our stay there last year) and then we ventured on down the trail along the ravine. I had been to this lower section on the last trip but Fielden stream had stayed in the campground. So I enjoyed showing her and our friends all the swimming holes and little waterfalls farther down. We ran into a father and daughter backpacking team a few times that morning along Sages Ravine, and would later run into them on Mt Race and at the campground. We chatted with them at the ‘official’ state line crossing and took some photos. The trail then headed up the side of Mt. Race, gradually but steadily, and the day began to warm up.

View southeast from Mt. Race

View southeast from Mt. Race

The trail made its way towards the ridgeline and climbed gradually through the woods, passing what was once an old campground at Bear Rock stream and it’s replacement across the trail, Laurel Ridge. I checked into Bear Rock to make sure no one was stealth camping and was happily surprised that people were staying out of the area and heeding its re-vegetation area signs. It is a lovely spot right on the ridge, with the stream cascading off its edge. I heard that there had been some accidents there in the past, which I’m sure had as much to do with it being moved west of the trail.

It was safe enough here to take a photo!

It was safe enough here to take a photo!

We continued to climb, some sections more steeply now, until we came out onto a large exposed ledge with sweeping views south to Connecticut, east and north as far as Mt. Greylock, Massachusetts’ highest peak near the Vermont border. We were lucky to have such great weather and endless views like that. There was one other backpacker here and we sat for lunch.  We were getting a little worked up about how bad the ledge walk would actually be. I had seen many pictures and had been preparing myself. And judging by the ledge we were having lunch on, I knew there was a big drop. I ventured over to look through the trees where the trail went to try and make it seem less intense, a lump in my throat growing the closer I got. I took it in — the very narrow trail following a precarious ledge thousands of feet high. I turned back around just as the father and daughter arrived and smiled and said “it’s not that bad.” I guess my game face isn’t very good.

View of Bear and Round Mtns in CT from Mt Race

View of Bear and Round Mtns in CT from Mt Race

Four vultures flew overhead and I joked that there was one for each of us. I don’t think that helped. We finished lunch and got ourselves ready for the cliff walk the best we could. As we passed through the little hole in the trees everyone saw what was ahead. Luckily there were only a few spots where it was this precarious, but those were enough. We gave each other a pep talk throughout and I was actually happy I had been working on these types of challenges because I felt sure footed and confident.

Pink Laurel on Mt Race summit

Pink Laurel on Mt Race summit

Though I won’t lie there were a few spots where a wrong step would mean certain death. Talking my friend through it and focusing on that also distracted me from any of my own fear. We were also heading up it so I think if we were coming down I might feel a little less sure.  I stopped to take in the views, and some pictures, which also helped me feel less afraid. I was really proud of myself.  I know these were big cliffs, and I know I had good reason to have been nervous and try and overprepare.

Mt Everett beyond from Mt Race summit

Mt Everett beyond from Mt Race summit

This section lasts only .6 miles and in many spots does widen out as it approaches the summit. So I was able to get one or two shots out there. There was a cairn a few hundred feet south of the summit and from there you could see 360 degrees around. The summits of Connecticut’s Bear Mountain and Round Mountains to the south became visible from here, as well as Mt Brace in New York, and Mt Frissell, Mount Washington and Mt Alander to the West. Directly to the north you could see the next day’s summit, Mt. Everett. And as we reached the true summit and walked its rocky spine, the high peaks of the Catskills were visible in the distance, their craggy peaks a shade of deep blue. A few pink mountain laurels were blossoming on the peak, and I was thrilled that the tunnels of laurel I wanted our friends to see were abundant on the hike. We took some summit photos and then negotiated our way down the steep rocky spine on its north side.

Descending from Mt. Race

Descending from Mt. Race

We were anxious to get to camp and unwind after the crazy cliffs. As we trekked through more tunnels of laurel, I decided I needed a bathroom break and told the others to go up ahead a bit. As they got ahead about 20ft, I turned around and headed into the woods but was stopped by a rattle! I did not see this guy, but Fielden and our friends heard it too and asked if I was ok! I decided I didn’t need to go any farther into the woods! I headed cautiously back up the trail and didn’t hear any more rattles before I met up with them. We picked up the pace a bit and kept an eye out for the trail junction to our campsite.

While we had entertained going over Everett on this day too, we decided when we reached the junction of the Race Brook Falls trail that we had had enough for the day. It was already nearly 5pm and after going over Everett the next day we were glad we had made this decision.

Time for a nap?

Time for a nap?

There was no way we were going to have made that climb feeling the way we were at this point in the day. The Race Brook Falls trail is one of many that climbs steeply up to the ridge from Route 41. From the A.T., the campsite is only about .2 miles down the trail, or so the guide says. I feel like it was more, but we were pretty darn tired. Those printed distances never seem accurate. They definitely are not on my tracking app, I learned the next day!

There are big falls at the bottom of this trail but I have heard its very steep down to the falls. And since the brook was barely moving up here, and we were so tired, we decided not to go down and explore them. Sages Ravine provided enough beautiful water scenery for us today, and we will come back to the falls from the road end another time. We did want to swim and pictured ourselves washing off under a cascading waterfall and everything. But reality is always a little different isn’t it. We were happy just setting up camp at this point. The father-daughter team came into camp around the same time and took the tent platform next to us, so we said hello again to them and told them we’d report back on the water source as we were going to filter once we set up camp.

Finally, the campsite trail

Finally, the campsite trail

After we got the tents set up, Ledges and I made a few trips to the brook and filled up on water. We had run almost completely out by the time we got to camp due to the heat. Its especially easy to overheat on all that exposed rock on the mountain summits. We sat around the fire and made dinner. Fires are permitted here and while I was surprised, I was relieved not to have to clear any fire rings, and that our friends could have that experience they are used to when camping out. Fielden is the best at making fires in our group so we let her get it going while Ledges and LB filtered water and I got dinner going. It was nice having two stoves, so we could get everything ready at the same time. I had made sure they had their own cook kit with stove (and their own water filtration) should we get separated or lost.

Home for the night

Home for the night

We had a great evening telling stories and then went to bed. It was a beautiful night and we left the vestibules open and watched as the stars came out. None of us slept very well though, hearing lots of critters scurrying about in the middle of the night. In the morning, we filtered some more water and had breakfast and I signed the register on the way out. We had a really big hike ahead for day 2. It started with a nearly 1,000ft climb up Mt. Everett. The trail had taken us several hundred feet downhill into a saddle between the two mountains where our campsite was. So once we got back on the A.T. it was right back up.

Aaand, back up!

Aaand, back up!

And it was STEEP. I would compare it to the climb up the north face of Bear Mountain, but twice as long. There were many elaborate scrambles and long sheets of rock to traverse as we ascended. Ledges said it definitely reminded him of the white mountains. That made me happy because I wanted an exciting section of trail, and it provided. We pushed on quickly, some thru hikers passing us on the way and making us look like snails with their pace. But we got up there and took in the views as they opened up, mostly to the south of Mt. Race and the Taconic plateau in its entirety as it stretched south to Salisbury.

At the summit I was immediately stung by something, either a yellowjacket or a black fly. But it didn’t hurt much or ruin the excitement. We took pictures at the summit and I had a celebratory toast. This is the highest peak we’ve hiked up together. I haven’t hiked the whites since I was a teenager, and in Shenandoah last year we only took the stony man trail from the Skyland lot, as we were driving Skyline drive. One of the hikers said when he arrived up there earlier there were some rattlesnakes he scared off. We talked to the other thru hikers and a couple that was day hiking. We sat on the foundations of the old fire tower and enjoyed our break. We thought it was going to be easy from here. Just downhill and then flat. Ha!

View south from Mt. Everett

View south from Mt. Everett

It was a nice easy downhill to the Mt. Everett State Reservation parking lot, where we found large coolers of ice cold water. This was much appreciated as the big climb depleted our supplies significantly, and we had many miles until the next reliable water source. Conditions have definitely been on the dry side. We talked to a thru hiker Matt who didn’t have a trail name yet. I wish we could have come up with one, but even LB is just our friends initials because we are waiting to come up with a trail name for her. You can’t force these things. He told us that in the 1,500 miles he’d done so far, the cliffs on Mt. Race were the most extreme he’d encountered yet. Even Tinker Cliffs in Virginia weren’t as precarious! That made us feel better. There’s a privy here too which is always nice.

Old fire tower spot

Old fire tower spot

The trail here is easy and after passing by Guilder pond (which I think is the highest pond in the state) descends gradually to a forested ridge where there are two shelters, Glen Brook and Hemlocks, situated .1 miles apart.  The water source here was very dry, and I was concerned about those staying here for the night. Maybe there was more water closer to the camping area, but where the brook crossed the trail was mostly mud. We traveled the forested ridge for a bit before it climbed to the rocky spine of Mt. Bushnell. Here the trail jotted up and down, up and down, taking a bit of a toll on us in the heat. We stopped for lunch in a shady spot before another climb. These were not big ascents but the repetitive climbing and descending was arduous. We passed a family day hiking and stopped on an outcropping with great views east and north of Mt. Greylock. We were stopping more and more now as the sun was baking us on these rocks and we thought for sure we’d be at Jug End by now.

Monument Mtn and Greylock beyond, from Mt Bushnell

Monument Mtn and Greylock beyond, from Mt Bushnell

Seemingly hours later, we arrived at the aptly named peak, which marks the northern end of the plateau on this ridge. A day hiker we passed who has hiked here about 100 times laughed when we asked if it was steep. Now I know why.  You might as well have rappelled down it. It began with several long, steep, rock faces to cross. After that, a literal rock wall we had to climb down. After that, the trail came out to another definite ledge. It routed you around at a downward angle on some slick rock with nothing but a huge drop off if you took the turn wrong.

Hemlock grove

Hemlock grove

Needless to say, some of us took a less dangerous path past it. Here we thought we’d be done with all that cliff walking! LB took the scary route. Go LB!  But that was not the end of it. The trail, though now in the forest, steeply descends the mountainside on a series of rock staircases and switchbacks. A bit like St. Johns ledges but far longer and not quite as easy to get footings on. It went on seemingly forever. We met the day hiker again, and when we asked where there was water, she said she’d leave us some at Rt 41, which we greatly appreciated. We were running low again. And its good we did because the water sources beyond were scarce except for a swamp right before we reached the car.

Bridge in Egremont

Bridge in Egremont

As we headed north from Jug End Road, we entered a forest of hemlocks, and then came out into the meadows alongside the Kellogg Conservation Center. From up on Jug End and Bushnell it seemed so far away and so far below. Finally we were passing fields of cows, and fairly close to the KCC and reached rt. 41 where we found the water she left us. We filled up and continued on through the fields. Here I was fooled by outdated distance information on my app. I knew from the AWOL guide that the mileage was something like 2.5 to the car from Jug End Road. But the old data on the app said 1.4. Needless to say it seemed like a really long walk, though it was beautiful. A large, very old hemlock forest again opened up from the meadow edge. I commented that it was like Middle earth, where you pass from realm to realm, this one being that of the elves!

Done!

Done!

There was supposed to be a large swamp here, and we crossed several bog bridges and planks, but there was hardly any water. Only as we approached the road did we cross an actual large brook on a big bridge. As we reached the end of the hike (1.5 miles shy of the actual section end at Rt. 7), we saw that the cooler of trail magic we found there when we dropped off the car the day before was still there. We meant to leave notes saying thank you for all these trail angels, but we were completely exhausted. Thank you trail angels!

Looks like we made it

Looks like we made it

We did just under 9 miles today and proceeded to throw our packs and ourselves on the grass and took a few photos to celebrate finishing the hike. There were also lots of deer ticks in the grass! So we quickly gathered up our things, made sure none of them were on us, and hopped in the car. We were so tired we just pointed to the Shay’s Rebellion monument and felt pleased that we didn’t leave the car at the originally planned point almost 2 miles farther.

Luxurious rewards

Luxurious rewards

Once in the car, it was back up the road again to the AMC Northwest camp to get the other car, and then down the dirt road across the Connecticut line into Salisbury. We saw beautiful waterfalls from the road as it wound and descended the mountain ridge alongside Lion’s Head. We got to our hotel and enjoyed a much needed shower and beer before going to dinner at a great restaurant called the Black Rabbit, next to Mizza’s pizza where I met Rainman a month or so ago. The food was amazing and we slept like logs that night in the king sized beds. The next morning we headed out of the mountains, grateful. We are already planning our next adventure. Though maybe we will do that one farther south in Virginia or North Carolina.

The video is here.

Miles day 1: 6.3

Miles day 2: 8.6

Bears: 0

Rattlesnakes: 1

— Linus