Ives Trail – Bennett’s Pond to Pine Mountain Out-and-back

Bennetts Pond Trailhead

Bennetts Pond Trailhead

The oh-so-convenient-to-home Ives Trail continues to provide new scenery each time I hike it. This time around I again had a time constraint so the 25 minute drive was perfect. I managed to squeeze in a nearly 6-mile hike in under 3 hrs and be back by noon to do what was needed at home!

This time I wanted to complete the southwestern section from the terminus in Ridgefield back to the Pine Mountain overlook, one of my favorite views around. I have done a tiny bit of the trail west of the overlook on our first trip up here, when we came up from the Danbury side via another trail a year or two ago.

But I never get tired of the view from this spot. It was a tougher hike this time to the summit, but one always worth the effort. I noticed even more lightning damaged trees this time, including on some lower elevation ridge lines as I reached the end of my hike. Clearly this area sees a lot of this activity.

Meadow with a view

Meadow with a view

This area of Ridgefield open space, known as Bennett’s Farm, has many trails, which then lead into the Hemlock Hills trails and Danbury trails, all which surround and intersect with the Ives Trail at one point or another. There is a nice trailhead lot here with a kiosk and map as well as other information. I found the beginning of the Ives trail at the Kiosk and headed into the woods.

Quite soon it opened into a hilltop meadow with nice views and a parking area which seems to be open seasonally for picnicking. As I descended the small hill the trail passed through more meadows which I suspect were once Bennett’s Farm, and then along side the pond. I’ve seen smaller bodies of water named lakes.

Bennetts Pond looking west

Bennetts Pond looking west

The pond stretches all the way from Rt 7 to the base of Pine mountain, and was full of beaver lodges, cattails, and even trees. Half iced over, it was very scenic, and calming. The trail follows the perimeter, crossing over a bridge and a rushing brook at another trail intersection along the way. I did not see any beavers but there were several geese on the water, filling the air with their calls.  Owls and other small birdsongs also made for a soothing soundscape.

Beaver Lodge

Beaver Lodge

Though the snow had almost all melted off since the last hike here, there were patches, and where there weren’t any snow or ice patches, there was mud and more mud. I felt like I was hiking Vermont in the spring! As its not good to hike along the edges of the trail as this can expand it too much, I did my best to follow it, but I came off the trail with quite a muddy bottom half, especially my boots. But I gotta say I am impressed with how well they handle it. At no point did I feel wet in my boots. They’re going on almost 400 miles now if not more but I hope to get another 400 out of them.

Old stone foundation

Old stone foundation

Soon I reached the base of Pine Mountain and a formidable ascent from this aspect. It looked to be about 650 feet of elevation gain in a fairy short distance. So while there were no significantly steep sections, it was definitely a workout reaching the summit. On the Ives trail it ascends the western flank from the base at the pond right to the summit with a series of switchbacks. The large boulder and rock outcroppings below the overlook were visible the whole way, as well as similar topography to the west of the trail where a gurgling stream also snaked down the mountainside. In fact this section of trail had many very active water sources from the runoff, and I almost stopped to filter some of the mountain water. There was also the foundation of what seems like an old silo or other grain storage type of building. I don’t think it was a shelter though someone had made a fire pit in the middle. There were several nice viewpoints on the climb and I stopped for a break to have some shot bloks and re-energize. My hurried breakfast before I left had consisted of a granola bar and a tangerine, which didn’t provide much calories compared to my usual pre-hike carb load! I was definitely hungry by the end of the hike, but didn’t have a long trip home to lunch.

Reaching the Pine Mtn overlook

Pine Mtn ledge with scorched tree

This time I had the summit to myself so I sat to take it in and explore more of the nooks and crannies. Someone had also made a fire ring here. I continue to lust after the crooked summit in the distance which I think is Seth Low mountain in nearby Seth Low Pierrepont state park, but I don’t see a trail up it on their map. I need to research that more. It seems like it would have a nice view. But perhaps there’s private property on the other side which is not visible from here.

Bennetts Pond from above

Bennetts Pond from above

As I didn’t have much time, I ventured on over the remainder of the summit and took in a nice easterly view of Bennett’s pond from another outcrop before descending another of the Bennett’s pond trail system routes back to the pond to pick up my return route. This handled the elevation difference with many more switchbacks, and great scenery of more dramatic rock walls that are hundreds of feet high.

I took several alternate trails back, avoiding the longer route of the Ives trail this time to reach the parking lot quicker. The last of these is where I saw the additional lightning damage, and this was along a stone wall with only a small elevation difference along the ridge it marked. This trail too was quite muddy and had mountain bike tire tracks for the length of its mile distance which connects at either end with a car-width trail blazed green and makes a good loop. The trail I took is not blazed, and is narrow, so I’d worry about coming around a turn to a biker speeding at me but I don’t know if its allowed. I know some of the trails say you can, even on the summit of Pine Mountain, and they suggest you carry your bike up the steep trails to its top. Not for me folks. I can’t see how carrying a large bike 600 ft uphill would be very much fun!

Dramatic rock cliffs

Dramatic rock cliffs

With the exception of the Pine mountain climb and descent, there was little elevation to contend with on the rest of the hike so I managed a swift pace and did the entire hike in under 3 hrs, with a few breaks. This completes the trail for me from its beginning in Ridgefield to just west of the Bethel and Redding borders where I left off last time. I have about 6 miles left to do of the entire trail. Maybe when I do that one I will get a ride to one end so I don’t need to make it a 12-miler to complete solo.  While I’d love to do 12 miles, its not something very easily fit into my schedule and would require most of a day.

Mud-ville

Mud-ville

However I manage it, I look forward to completing this beautiful trail, and bringing friends and family back to explore favorite spots when we are nearby and have limited time. This weekend I’m exploring more of the Mattatuck trail with our AMC group. This section includes Buttermilk Falls which are supposed to be raging at the moment.

I signed up for a wilderness first aid course training weekend at the end of April which will be a great skill set to have for my trail patrol and our family hikes. I was also down in Florida last week and we planned our dates for our June section hike with our friends from there over Mt Race and Mt Everett in Massachusetts on the Appalachian Trail. I can’t wait! And before bed last night I planned out the logistics of our completion of the New York A.T. this summer. Happy trails.

Total miles: 5.7

— Linus

Appalachian Trail – CT Section 1 – Part 2

Mountain Laurel everywhere

Mountain Laurel everywhere

Hi all – this is Fielden Stream reporting in!  Just wanted to add my own info on our recent hike. First off – I was very worried about this hike as there was going to be a lot of steep sections and it was going to be the second 2-nighter that we had ever done.  So we truly underestimated our abilities here – mostly to be on the safe side.

This ended up meaning that we got to both of our campsites super early, which isn’t necessarily my preference, but it ended up being a nice relaxing addition to our trip.  This was especially true the second night as we had a gorgeous brook called Sages Ravine running right near the campsite with watering holes and 14 beautiful waterfalls.

But back to the first night.  Riga Shelter I guess is a very popular campsite mostly because it has a nice view.  It also has some private campsites that are surrounded by trees so you really don’t have to spend time with other hikers if you don’t want to.  The privy was pretty decent too although it did smell a bit.  The only thing that marred the beauty was the semi-burnt shelter (some idiot in January did it), but the trail maintainers are supposed to be fixing that this weekend.  It was a bit buggy though.  I also didn’t like the fact that you had to walk pretty far to get to the beginning and to the privy from almost everywhere (although Sages Ravine was even worse!)  There was also no picnic table – which isn’t a deal-breaker, but does tend to add a nice element.  And we did meet some more nice thru-hikers (AYCE, Buster and Sparkles) while we were there which always makes it a more fun trip.

The second night — after a heart-attack-causing decent down Bear Mountain — was at Sages Ravine.  This campsite does not have a shelter so you don’t have too many thru-hikers staying there.  They do have a camp steward though who lives there for a few days every week (they rotate them through) which was interesting as we got info about the area and some of the issues of maintaining trails. Everyone who can should volunteer to maintain trails as If you love nature it’s a great way of giving back!

Arriving at Sages Ravine Campsite in Mass

Arriving at Sages Ravine Campsite in Mass

My biggest problem with Sages was how far (and uphill!) every campsite and privy was from everything else.  I think we did more mileage walking back and forth from the campsite to the brook to the privy and back again than walking the actual trail!  The privy was also on the lower quality scale.  It was composting, but it had not been updated in quite a while and there was a big rock holding the door shut, which you had to move in order to get inside.  And like I said, it was at least an eighth of a mile from our campsite.

But our campsite was nice. We decided to set up at a group site because we wanted some company, and we got some!  We also got a nice view of a side ravine and a nice breeze that helped keep the bugs away.  And quite a thunderstorm when we were happily tucked away in our tent for the night. Many of the other campsites were up on a hill even higher than us and were in the middle of fields of grass.  Personally, I’m not a fan of camping near grass because of snakes and ticks.

We met some garter snakes along the trail yesterday, and when we arrived at Sages we were greeted by a friendly resident deer, and what we think was a bear shortly after setting up camp. Though no actual sighting occurred, few animals could snap an entire tree limb as dramatically and make the loud thump we heard hitting the ground seconds after. Luckily if it was a bear cub it ran the other way. Since we were just reading a humorous anecdote about bears in Bill Bryson’s “A walk in the woods” it just had to be a bear…

Pink Honeysuckle?

Pink Honeysuckle?

But the best part of Sages was the brook itself, and washing our feet in the deliciously cold water.  I could do that for hours.  All of my blisters stopped hurting for for like 5 minutes! The third day we got up super early so we could go have lunch at a restaurant later.  I couldn’t wait for hot food and a real bathroom. The hike out was on a side trail called Paradise Lane and I do have to say it was very paradisical! The Mountain Laurel, which is the CT state flower, was just reaching peak and it was stunning to walk through archways of them. There were also some very pretty swampy areas with bullfrogs talking to each other.  And then it was on to our delicious lunch at Toymakers Cafe in Falls Village.  If you go, get the sausage and biscuits.  They were outstanding!!!!

As we finally finished the state, we put up our video and you can view the link to it on our new youtube channel. We hope you enjoy it, though we are admittedly not film directors.

— Fielden Stream