Mattabessett/New England Trail, Net50 Challenge Completion

On Saturday I hit the New England Trail once again with my brother. While I never managed to get out there over the Thanksgiving holiday, this past Saturday was a beautiful day for a hike. Temps hovered around 45 and felt warmer on the exposed rocks. It was clear, dry and visibility was grand. We could see all the way north to Hartford and south to Hamden and Sleeping Giant, West to the Hanging Hills of Meriden and East to The Connecticut River Valley. This was also the last hike I needed to complete the New England Trail 50 challenge. You can achieve it in a variety of ways, including hikes, volunteering, overnights on the trail, advocacy, donations to trail organizations, and social media sharing to raise awareness on the trail. It has been a lot of fun and I am glad to have helped in any way I could to raise awareness of the trail, and celebrate the 50th anniversary of the National Trails Act.

After a slightly sketchy crossing of the outlet of the Hubbard Reservoir at the start (did manage to sink a foot into the cold water a bit), the ascent up Chauncey Peak was quick, and easier thanks to a series of new switchbacks. These are also to benefit the hillside as the very steep original route contributes to erosion. The top of the ridgeline criss-crosses from the western to the eastern edge, where a large quarry operation exists. While that view wasn’t as scenic due to the mining site, there were still nice views beyond. And the western facing ridgeline walks were the real treat, with more of the dramatic basalt (trap rock) ledges to explore and trace as you make your way north , with Lamentation mountain just to the west and the Hubbard Reservoir directly below between the two mountains.

After descending the mountain, the trail winds through some rolling hills in the northern end of Giuffrida park, and then a lovely Hemlock forest before a short road walk (with great views of Chauncey Peak) over to the Highland Pond Preserve which makes up the last of the wooded portion of this section. The last 1.4 miles of this hike was along the paved Country Club road, but this is already an improvement as it used to be almost twice as much of a road walk before they got the portion through the forest and the preserve added in the last few years. Its great to see the hard work of trail organizations, continuing to work on improving trail conditions and acquiring new land for the trail. This is another reason why it’s a pleasure doing volunteer work myself with the AMC, because I experience the joy first-hand.

Now that I’ve completed the challenge, I want to get back to more of my favorite trail – the Appalachian Trail! But I also plan to finish the last 11 miles of the Mohawk trail In the coming months, as well as doing more hikes on the New England trail. I’d like to finish off the Mattabessett section next. I hope to have my brother along on those hikes as the location is central for both of us, and we have a lot of fun hiking together. Photos below.

Miles : 5.7

– Linus

Ascending Chauncey Peak

Ascending Chauncey Peak

My brother near the peak

My brother near the peak

Linus on the summit looking southwest to Sleeping Giant

Linus on the summit looking southwest to Sleeping Giant

My brother and I goofing around on Chauncey Peak

My brother and I goofing around on Chauncey Peak

View of Hubbard Resevoir and Lamentation Mountain beyond

View of Hubbard Resevoir and Lamentation Mountain beyond

Beautiful Hemlock forest

Beautiful Hemlock forest

Entering Highland Pond Preserve

Entering Highland Pond Preserve

Highland Pond Preserve

Highland Pond Preserve

 

Mt Tom State Reservation, New England/Metacomet-Manondnock Trail, Massachusetts

Easthampton from the trail

Easthampton from the trail

Last weekend we were in the Berkshires to celebrate Fielden Stream’s birthday with friends at their lake house.  While the girls were off enjoying a Yoga and meditation retreat, I headed for the mountains once again. The goal this time was to check out the Mount Tom State Reservation for the first time. In the process, I could also contribute towards my miles for the #Hike50Net challenge. This is the challenge to accumulate 50 points in the calendar year on the New England National Scenic Trail by a combination of hiked miles, sharing images, writing Hike-u’s and volunteering.

Walking among the ledges

Walking among the ledges

As you may remember I brought my brother out on part of the Mattabessett trail section in Connecticut earlier this summer. Here in Massachusetts the N.E.T is comprised of the Metacomet and Manondnock trails, stretching from the Massachusetts state line to its finale atop Mt. Manodnock on the New Hampshire border.

As I didn’t have anyone along with me or a shuttle arranged, i did an out-and-back from the south side of the park, so I will have to go back another time and do the same from the north end to complete the section sometime in the future.  No problem. Not only should it be an easy one to convince someone to come along on just for the views, but its no more than five miles out and back from the north end so not too bad mileage-wise either.

Plenty of scrambles

Plenty of scrambles

There seems to have been some re-routing off the road which wasn’t on my map, but to make sure I was sticking on the route in my tracker, I did the .4 road walk at the beginning and end. I see now why it was re-routed, but it was also much further into the woods in that area, and I had limited time.

It was a very steep climb up from the base of Mt. Tom to the summit, over a mile of loose, basalt scree. Basalt is the red volcanic rock prevalent along this trail’s ridgelines. It was slow going both up and down the big climb for this reason. I realize it probably helps prevent erosion, but it felt like being on roller skates sometimes. There were not many switchbacks to ease the ascent, but fortunately it was only about 7-800ft tops.

Name that flower

Name that flower

Once at the summit of Mt. Tom, there were many hikers enjoying the long views in all directions. This used to be a ski area when I was a kid and I remember seeing its trails lit up for night skiing whenever we would pass it on 91 north on our way to Vermont. There are a bunch of large radio towers up there as well as old foundations for the ski lifts and infrastructure. I don’t know if there are any old ski buildings left on the other side. I believe they have a winter park there for tubing and such, so they may have left the lodge.

The NET follows the western ridge so this was the steep side with no trails. There are trails that go along the front and I imagine there are traces left of the ski trails. At some point I will do those as I would be interested to see that. I never did ski there, which is a shame.

The trail along the ledges

The trail along the ledges

For the entire ridge line, the trail hugs the cliff edges, with the occasional dip back into the woods here and there. But this was not to ease an ascent or descent – there were plenty of those along the steep ledges. This is similar to the sections in Connecticut as well, so it was not new for me by any means. These trails are where I cut my teeth and faced my fears in preparation for similar terrain on the Appalachian Trail. The basalt however is looser and broken in many places, making it all the more important to take your time.

It was encouraging to me to realize that over the miles of cliff walks I needed to do on this hike, I have come a long way in facing my fear of such things, and it made me feel strong and confident. I hiked over three peaks and back: Mt. Tom, Deadtopp, and Whiting Peak. Next time I will conquer the remaining three in the range from the northern end.

Ledges with the Oxbow beyond

Ledges with the Oxbow beyond

Another highlight was I was able to view the Oxbow in the famous Thomas Cole painting from the ledges. That painting was actually made from the ledges of nearby Mount Holyoke in Northampton, however.  You can see it in the last photo.

Miles: 6.6

(with a short .4 out and back in the wrong direction at the start!)

— Linus

Mattabessett Trail and Lamentation Mountain, Connecticut

Climbing up to the ridge

Climbing up to the ridge

Today I visited the Mattabessett (and by extension the New England National Scenic Trail) for the first time in many years. I’ve been obviously very focused on the Appalachian National Scenic Trail and I don’t see that stopping anytime soon. But I am privileged to have not only part of the A.T. so close by but also, over 800 more miles of hiking trails in my state including the Mattabessett and Metacomet trails, now part of the NET. The New England National Scenic Trail was officially established in 2009 and runs from Long Island Sound on the Connecticut coast all the way to the Massachusetts/New Hampshire border where it ends on Mount Monadnock. Since the trail is relatively new there’s still a good number of road walks and not many shelters or campsites. So while doing a proper thru is a little tricky right now, it’s in its early stages and more sections are being routed off roads as often as the land can be acquired.

On the ridge with view north to Hartford in distance

On the ridge with view north to Hartford in distance

Land management and acquistion and re-routing is a lot of work and I’m sure over time it will become more like the other national scenic trails in those ways. I was considering doing some backpacking yesterday and staying at one of them but it was .1 from a road and there was no water source that I could tell besides possibly the use of a spigot on the nearby house (who built the shelter and campsite on their land).  I’m also not sure if there was a privy not that that’s a game changer but is a little awkward when the latrine is someone’s property. I have to research it more maybe there is a porto-potty. I was also honestly still sore from the epic Massachusetts finale last weekend.

With Meriden's hanging hills in the distance

With Meriden’s hanging hills in the distance

I had planned to do this hike with my brother today either way so I decided it would be best to listen to my body yesterday and I did. I got all my log sheets out for these trails and for their Hike 50 Challenge. As it’s the 50th anniversary of the National Trails Act, there are many challenges this year on many long distance scenic trails to celebrate it.

I already completed the Connecticut AMC’s hike 50 challenge, which of course with my being a Connecticut AMC volunteer and summer ridgerunner, wasn’t really hard.

Victory pose looking west

Victory pose looking west

So I decided it would be fun to do the New England Trail challenge. I also have been meaning to hike with my brother again who lives outside Hartford. I knew he would like the amazing views and ridge walking, and it’s even closer to his house than mine! If possible we are going to try and complete the challenge together but either way we had a great time. You can earn points in many different ways, from by the mile, to trail work, trail events, social media shares, writing a hike-u, and more!

My Hike-U

My Hike-U

These all help to get the word out and draw attention to the trail.  It was a gorgeous day and the humidity was mitigated by the breezes along the ridge. We saw many others out enjoying it today, including one very large group who apparently each brought their own car and filled up almost the entire lot. Bad form, people. Car pool or limit your group size. No one should have to park illegally so you can do your group hike. But I held my tongue because after all a bunch of folks were out enjoying nature and excercise in my favorite way, and my only issue is with the leader.

My classic shot

My classic shot

Starting off we did about a mile road walk from Berlin Turnpike where the Mattabessett portion ends and then the trail turned and headed southbound into the woods for another half mile along the bottom of Lamentation Mountain. This is the mountain whose western ridge we’d be climbing and following all the way back to Guiffrida State park where we left our other car. The first 1/4 mile was littered with rusted out cars and a tire or two. It was a bit muddy and slightly overgrown as well but as it was an old road these things weren’t particularly an issue or totally out of character. The blazing could use a little bit of work here because there’s a few turns this way and that and not all were easy to decipher without walking down one way a bit. Anyway, I’m grateful to have the trail here. This whole northern end of Lamentation Mountain was closed for a few years by a property owner so the CFPA who manages this trail had to reroute it to get it back to completion.  I appreciate this effort and this new route, and I’m sure it will soon be much nicer.

Ledge Notch

Ledge Notch

There was a brisk little climb up to the ridgeline then the views began to open up one after the other. We could see the hanging hills of Meriden and Castle Craig, farther west to Southington and the Tunxis trail region and north to Hartford. I taught my brother about the basalt trap rock ledges and their unique geology and even almost rolled an ankle coming down from the ledge on one of the little pebble size ones! Up there we also saw hawks soaring overhead, and the new CT Rail train across the lake making its way north to Hartford and Springfield. (We later ate lunch at a brand new train station along the new line in Berlin). I love trains, so it was a treat watching a brand new train line chug along its brand new route, especially from a mountaintop!

At Guiffrida Park

At Guiffrida Park

The final portion of the hike was a walk along the Hubbard reservoir in the state park, which had a small entrance for wading in and views of Chauncey peak hovering above to the east. We will be back to do that one and the remainder of the section south to where I left off north of Mt. Higby. Then we will head south to Durham for the TriMountain section and then move on to complete the eastern spur, though I’ve done about 5 miles of that. I’m also working on completing the whole Mattabessett so these are the parts I’ve yet to do.

I’m looking forward to more hikes with my brother and this fun little challenge to help keep us at it. Stay tuned for more adventures on the New England National Scenic Trail.

Now to plan the next Appalachian Trail overnight. Hmmm, more Jersey?

Miles: 5.1

— Linus